Latest Stories

  1. Ten years on, Kata Dacre

    Ten years on, Kata Dacre

    A big thanks to Kata Dacre, a fundamental member of our retail department who has achieved ten years of service with us. Kata has not been afraid to get stuck in since she joined us and has been involved in various roles before becoming the Retail Deputy Manager. Find out what she had to say about her time at Johnsons below:

    1. How did you come to work for Johnsons?

    Johnsons had a connection with the University I studied at in Budapest. In 2009 I had the chance to come and work for the company and completed 4-months of work experience to get my degree. In 2010, a week after I graduated from Uni, I moved to England and worked for JOW.

    2. Did you work anywhere before Johnsons?

    No, Johnsons is the first company I’ve worked for.

    3. What roles have you worked in previously at Johnsons, and what do you do now?

    The first time I worked on the Container unit, I lifted plants for Amenity, and after that, I drifted to the Retail shed and have worked there ever since, you name it, I’ve done it.

    In the past 2 years, I have been the Retail Deputy Manager. I’m responsible for: checking off the trolleys before they get loaded onto the wagons, monitoring and topping up colour label stock. During the winter season, I check off and help sort the incoming bare root products.

    4. Do you feel like much has changed in the past ten years?

    It has got much busier. I have more responsibility which I like a lot. I have made good friends in the past few years. It was very hard at the beginning regarding the language barrier, the new setting, first-ever job. Still, I’ve received so much support, good and not so good critics, educational opportunities that have made me grow into the person I am today.

    5. Your most memorable day at Johnsons? 

    During my work experience here, I met Jason, and the rest is history. We had our 10th wedding anniversary last month.

    6. If you could have chosen another career, what do you think it would have been?

    If I hadn’t moved to England, I would have spent more time in education. I would like to have become a Garden Designer.

    7. Favourite part of your job?

    Because I do so many different things, I never get bored. There are always challenges which I like.

    8. What do you hope to achieve in the next ten years?

    I’m open to anything. I’m not afraid to learn new things or do something different or maybe look after and run a unit one day.

     

    Posted 8th Dec 8:39am
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  2. Ten years service for Martyn Osborne

    Ten years service for Martyn Osborne

    A big thanks to Martyn Osborne for his hard work and commitment to the company over the past ten years. He works extremely hard and is also known as Johnsons ‘early bird’, setting up vehicles for the days work ahead when most of us are still in bed. He is a crucial member of the JOW team and can be seen flying from one task to the next. Find out what he said about his time at Johnsons below.

    1)Tell us about the last ten years at Johnsons; what roles have you previously been involved in, and what do you do now?

    The last ten years have flown by. For the first five years, I worked in retail for Steve Morton, the last five years Dave Barrett and the last ten winters Tony Green in Incoming Goods and Dispatch if needed.

    2) What did you do before working at Johnsons?

    I was a delivery driver for Oddbins.

    3) What have you learnt during your time at Johnsons that you didn’t know before?

    I have learnt so much about plants and trees, which has been very rewarding. As a delivery driver, you are isolated, so working with people and plants has been new to me.

    4) What has motivated you to come to work each day?

    I enjoy my job and want to do it to the best of my ability.

    5)Proudest career moment?

    Earlier this year, Covid wiped out the retail department and I had to step up while key managers were off ill, it was great that we still fulfilled the diary and order book and i enjoyed the challenge.

    6) As a kid, what did you want to be when you grew up?

    A formula one driver

    7) Favourite plant variety?

    Salvia, there’s so many different varieties, shapes and colours. They come back stronger year after year. They are closely followed by Peonies. Both of which I have an array of in my garden at home.

    8) Favourite memory from your time at Johnsons? 

    While delivering plants to Inverness, I got to see the Northern Lights.

    As a thank you for his service, Martin has been rewarded with a certificate and £100 in vouchers.

    Posted 6th Dec 11:25am
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  3. December Gardening Reminders 2021

    December Gardening Reminders 2021

    As we approach the end of 2021, theirs plenty to keep you busy within the garden this month, from moving plants that have outgrown their space to planting roses and, of course, winter digging. Check out our December hints and tips below put together by our Chairman and Horticulturist, John Richardson.

     

    1)   After long periods of November rain, often heavy, fallen leaves have become a congealed mass on lawns and many garden corners,  try and clear them away to the compost heap before they start to rot and affect so many plants such as herbaceous, alpines, low growing shrubs and plants in containers.

     

    2)  Any plants which are now too big for their location or ‘in the wrong place’ can be safely moved, and the soil in December is usually warm enough to stimulate the production of new roots. Stake tall new plants to prevent wind rock until well-rooted and reduce their size if appropriate.

     

    3)  Place undercover any tender plants which have been overlooked earlier in the autumn and ensure that such plants growing in the ground are wrapped in straw and hessian, polythene is not the best material as it prevents air from getting to the plant.

     

    4)  If you intend to get on with the winter digging, cover a suitable area with polythene so that the ground is not waterlogged when you wish to dig.

     

    5)  Clean moss and lichens from paths and walls.  There are several commercial brands of cleaner available, but bleach is equally as good.  A power washer will make light work of the job, which is impressive when completed!

     

    6)  Lower temperatures and frost is forecast, make sure your bird feeding stations are clean and regularly refilled.  The same applies to an accessible water supply.  Remember, cooked food as opposed to birdseed may well attract vermin.

     

    7)  with long periods of rain expected, don’t forget to put a glass or plastic sheet over your alpine plants to keep off the majority of the rain.

     

    8)  Now is a good time to plant roses, heel them in if soil conditions are not suitable for immediate planting.

     

    9)  Before planting trees and shrubs ensure roots are moist by soaking in a bucket or similar.

     

    10)   This month is a good time to prune Birch and Acers.  Trim the lawn edges for a quick lift!

     

    11)   Check apples and other stored fruits for signs of rotting and throw out damaged fruit for the birds. Remove mummified fruits from the apple trees.

     

    12)  Start Amaryllis (Hippeastrum) bulbs into growth urgently if required to flower by Christmas.

     

    13)  Tidy up the greenhouse during inclement weather, and also prune glasshouse grown grapevines.

     

    14)  Be ready to plant tulip bulbs after the middle of the month to reduce tulip disease (Tulip Fire).

     

    15)  Insulate with bubble-wrap and hessian those plant containers which are to be left outside over winter, in order to prevent the pots cracking in frosty periods.

     

    16)  Thoroughly clean and grease the lawnmower and sharpen or replace the blades.

     

    17)  The earlier any winter digging can be done, the better, as this allows rain, snow, frost and ice to break down clods of soil and make cultivation in the spring so much easier.

    Posted 30th Nov 9:37am
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  4. The Growers Choice: Hedging varieties for full sun

    The Growers Choice: Hedging varieties for full sun

    Is your next garden project a bit of a suntrap? do you require hedging varieties for a full sun position? we have you covered with our favourite hedging varieties for full sun below from Photinia to Prunus and even Lavender for your smaller hedging requirements.

     

    Cornus Elegantissima 

    Grey-green leaves with creamy-white flowers in early summer and red stems that can be seen during the winter periods, plant in a sunny position for best results.

    ? Flowers: May – June

    ? Position: Full sun to partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 2 metres

    ? Soil: well-drained soil

    Available in 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L + pot sizes and as bareroot from November – March

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    Grisellina littoralis 

    A great hedging plant for a seaside retreat with large glossy, apple green ovate leaves. Grow in moist well-drained soil in a sheltered sunny spot for best results.

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 12 metres

    ? Soil: well-drained soil

    Available in 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L + pot sizes and as a rootball and bare-root plants from November – March

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    Lavender Hidcote – why not choose a lavender plant for a scented small hedge in a sunny position? perfect for the edge of a path or small hedge at the front of a garden. This plant will also attract pollinators to your garden. Head to our pollinator-friendly plants guide for more bee loving plant varieties.

    ?Flowers: July – September

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 0.6 metres

    ? Soil: well-drained, fertile soil

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    Photinia ‘Red Robin’- A versatile evergreen shrub that can be used for hedging, trained against a wall and even used as a ½ std tree once trained. It is happy in most fertile soils, in either a sunny or shaded position. If you wish to encourage its strong red growth and more flowers, it will be better planted in a full sun position. White flowers appear by April and into May once the plant is better established. We have found Photinia ‘Red ‘Robin’ to become ‘leggy’ over time if it is not properly maintained and left to run away with themselves, they can grow up to 4m tall and up to 4 m wide.

    ?Flowers: April – May

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 4 metres

    ? Soil: well-drained, fertile soil

    Available in 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L + pot sizes and as a rootball from November – March

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    Pyracantha varieties

    Known for their colourful berries available in yellow, reds and oranges which will last from Autumn through to Spring if left untouched by birds. Great against a back wall these Pyracantha will stop intruders. Available potted throughout the year.

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 3 metres

    ? Soil: well-drained, fertile soil

    Available in 2LD, 3LD, 5L, 10L and 20L + pot sizes 

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    Prunus Rotundifolia 

    A vigorous, dense evergreen shrub suitable for almost all locations. Large, glossy green leaves make this a go-to plant above other Prunus varieties.  Its density makes it ideal for screening for privacy, and it is a great barrier to noise and wind. Commonly known as laurel, this hedging variety grows up to 60cm per year and is relatively happy in most soil conditions.

    ?Flowers: April

    ? Position: Full sun – full shade

    ? Height: Up to 5 metres

    ? Soil: well-drained, moist soil, do not plant in shallow chalk

    Available in 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L + pot sizes and as a rootball and bare root plants from November – March

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    Prunus Lusitanica

    Also known as Portuguese laurel, boast luscious dark green glossy leaves on deep maroon stems with small, fragrant white flowers in the summer which are loved by pollinators and red berries in the autumn which are very popular with birds.

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 15 metres

    ? Soil: well-drained, moist soil, do not plant in shallow chalk

    Available in 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L + pot sizes and as a rootball from November – March

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    Rosa rugosa

    A hardy, easy to grow rose with pink scented flowers from June through to September, followed by bright scarlet hips. A dense, vigorous growing hedging variety happy in full sun.

    ?Flowers: June – September

    ? Position: Full sun – full shade

    ? Height: Up to 1.5 metres

    ? Soil: well-drained soil

    Available in 2L, 3L  + pot sizes and as bare-root plants from November – March

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    Click here for more hedging solutions

     

    Posted 30th Nov 2:29pm
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  5. The Growers Choice - Plants with winter interest

    The Growers Choice - Plants with winter interest

    There’s plenty of interest to be had from plants during the winter months whether that be the scent of Sarcococca or the flowers of Helleborus plants, check out some of our favourites below

    Cornus varieties such as ‘Midwinter Fire’, and ‘Sibrica’ 

    Cornus are known for their coloured stems that are revealed when their leaves fall. Shades of red, yellow and orange stems are available.

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Flowers: May – June

    ? Height: Up to 3m (depending on the variety)

    ? Width: Up to 2m (depending on the variety)

    Soil: moderately fertile soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L ( subject to availability and the variety)

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    Sarcococca varieties such as ‘Confusa’ and hookeriana ‘Winter Gem’

    Highly scented white flowers sit above large glossy, rich green leaves come late winter – early spring. It is a great addition to a shady border or a shaded patio spot where you can smell it every day.

    ? Flowers: Late winter-early spring

    ?Position: Partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 0.5m

    Soil:fertile, well-drained, moist soil

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    Hellebore varieties

    Hellebores are compact, clump-forming perennials with dark green, leathery leaves and stunning flowers.

    A tremendous shade-loving border plant that will brighten up your garden when little else is flowering from December – March.

    ? Flowers: December – March (depending on the variety)

    ?Position: Partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 45cn (depending on the variety)

    Soil: Heavy, neutral to alkaline soil

    It would help if you planted in partial to full shade for best results and cut back old leaves in January – February to show off new flowers.

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    Mahonia varieties such as ‘Charity’ and ‘Winter Sun’

    Are the perfect addition to a shaded spot in your garden as they prefer full – partial shade with spikes of yellow flowers from November through to March that has a fragrant reminiscent of lily-of-the-valley on dark green holly-like leaves. Prune in spring after flowering.

    ?Flowers:  November – March (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 5m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moist-well-drained, fertile, humus-rich soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L, 20L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

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    Skimmia varieties such as ‘Rubella’ and ‘Kew Green’

    Are you in need of some autumn/winter colour? Skimmia Rubella are known for their dark red flower buds that are produced in autumn and last through to winter until the flowers open in spring — an excellent plant for a patio pot or border.

    ?Flowers:  April – May (depending on variety) flower buds are seen in autumn-winter.

    ? Position: Partial – full shade

    ? Height: Up to 1.5m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moist-well-drained, acid soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

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    Viburnum varieties 

    Evergreen Viburnums such as tinus are a great shrub for winter interest with dark green leaves and clusters of tiny white flowers from December to April.

    A great low maintenance easy to grow shrub that can brighten a part shaded area of the garden when little else is flowering.

    ?Flowers:  December – April

    ? Position: Full sun or partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 3m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, moist-well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

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    Hamamelis varieties 

    Hamamelis plants are covered in branches of distinctive, spider-like, fragrant flowers in red, yellow, and orange shades from January to early spring.

    Whilst slow growing this plant variety can become a large spreading shrub or small tree. A fantastic specimen plant that will make a great addition to the middle or back of a border.

    Plant in well-drained, neutral acid soil in full sun to partial shade for best results.

    ?Flowers: January – February

    ☀️ Position: Full sun – Partial shade

     Pot size: 5L, 10L, 20L + (depending on variety and subject to availability)

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    Jasminum nudiflorum

    A deciduous climber with bright yellow flowers that appear on bare stems in winter and early spring helping to brighten up a dark winter’s day. This attractive climber will grow well against a trellis or low wall once trained as it is not self-clinging.

    ?Flowers: January – March

    ☀️ Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 3m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, moist-well-drained soil

     Pot size:  2LD, 3LD  ( subject to availability)

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    Posted 24th Nov 5:21pm
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  6. Plant Centre celebrates best year ever

    Plant Centre celebrates best year ever

    Our onsite plant centre is celebrating its best year ever, with a turnover of over 2 million, for the first time in its history. Johnsons of Whixleys overall turnover was just over 15 million, another record for the company in its 100th-year history.

    The plant centre division, which Alice Knowles runs, was responsible for selling over 340,000 items and has seen a 12.62% increase of new customers and an increase in sales of 21.07% on the previous financial year.

    The division’s successes are due to an increase in demand for garden projects and restorations by the public who have been putting their usual holiday funds into their gardens, which has made Landscapers, Garden Designers, Property Developers and others within the industry much busier. People also recognise the importance of a greener world and how plants can help the environment. We have also improved our website and social media pages and sent out regular PR campaigns, which have increased our visibility within the industry and increased the number of new customers on our system.

    Plant Centre Manager Alice Knowles said: ” We are incredibly proud to have achieved our best year ever. We have adapted to the challenges Brexit has brought and have taken on board customer feedback and requirements, including moving away from traditional lines. We have increased our range and have added more unusual and exciting lines. I’m continually looking at ways to evolve the plant centre, including keeping up with the demand and the different requirements.

    There has also been a few changes to our department with new faces joining our sales and operations side; find out more about the whole team below.”

    MEET THE TEAM

    Find out about our Amenity Sector and its changes by clicking here

     

    Posted 18th Nov 9:13am
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  7. The Growers Choice - Hedging for an exposed site

    The Growers Choice - Hedging for an exposed site

    Is your next project without any natural defence and exposed to the elements such as strong winds? we have put together a list of hedging varieties that are suitable for an exposed site below

    Acer campestre 

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 4M

    ? Soil: any soil (except water-logged sites)

    A deciduous resilient species that filters the wind more than evergreen varieties, creating a more sheltered spot it is a great hedging variety for an exposed site.

    Available in bare-root sizes 60-80cm and seedling 30-40cm. Also available in 2L, 3L, 5L & 10L.

    Crataegus monogyna

    A popular native hedging plant is known for its large thorns, which can be seen after its green leaves fall in Autumn. It is also known for its white scented flowers, which can be seen in Spring.

    A hardy species suited to the cold and windy conditions of an inland exposed site, even in windy areas it will grow up to 3m tall.

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 3M in an exposed location

    ? Soil: any soil (except water-logged sites)

    Available in bare-root sizes from 40-60cm up to 200cm tall and in container pots after the bare root season.

    Cupressus Leylandii

    Is one of the fastest evergreen hedging varieties that can grow up to 3ft per year with its eventual height reaching up to 12m. Great as a windbreak, general barrier and for noise reduction. A hardy plant that is well suited to a cold exposed site. Perform regular maintenance to help form a dense hedge.

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 12 metres

    ? Soil: well-drained soil

    Available in 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L + pot sizes

    Cotoneaster Franchetii 

    Is a hardy variety suited to an exposed inland sites and coastal sites with sage green leaves with a white underside and pink flowers in early summer with deep orange berries in autumn.

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 3 metres

    ? Soil: Any except water-logged

    Available in 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L + pot sizes

    Taxus Baccata 

    A dark green evergreen hedging variety with needle-like leaves, ideal for an exposed site as it filters down the wind.  This variety is commonly known as ‘Yew’. It is a popular variety often used in stately homes grounds and private gardens. This hedging variety is easy to trim and can be used to create shapes for a statement feature or simply cut to create a clean line.

    Red berries are seen come Autumn, which are loved by birds but harmful to humans, pets and livestock if eaten. This slow-growing variety prefers fertile, well-drained soil.

    Available in 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L + pot sizes and as a rootball from November – March

    ?Flowers: April

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 20 metres

    ? Soil: well-drained, fertile soil

    Grisellina littoralis

    A great hedging plant for a seaside retreat with large glossy, apple green ovate leaves. Grow in moist well-drained soil in a sheltered sunny spot for best results.

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 12 metres

    ? Soil: well-drained soil

    Available in 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L + pot sizes

     

    Posted 22nd Nov 4:38pm
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  8. November Gardening Reminders 2021

    November Gardening Reminders 2021

    November reminds us that winter is on its way with leaves on the trees falling rapidly and the increase of rain and wind. During November container plants and some ground plants will need protection from the frosts, wind and freezing rain. November is also the start of the Bare Root and Root Ball season so there’s plenty to be on with this month. Check out our latest hints and tips put together by horticulturist John Richardson.

     

    1) The earlier winter digging can be done, the better, as this allows rain, snow, and frost to break down the clods of soil which will make cultivations in the spring so much easier.

    2)Collect and dispose of the fallen fruits from apple trees, many will be damaged and prone to spreading diseases such as brown rot.

    3)Divide and replant rhizomatous Iris, and layer Carnations and Pinks. Peg them into moist soil after carefully cracking a small section of the stem. Ensure the treated area remains in moist soil.

    4)Now is the best time to plant roses, buying plants that are field-grown (bare-root) is the most economic and will survive just as well as container-grown plants if kept moist when out of the ground. For long delays, heel in the roots of the plant in an area that is not waterlogged.

    5)Replace those small patches of the lawn which have become damaged, with turf from a less obvious area. Do not perform this task when the soil is waterlogged or frozen.

    6)Take the opportunity to cut back overgrown hedges, either mechanically on deciduous plants or with secateurs and a saw on large-leafed evergreens such as laurels and rhododendrons. Trim conifer hedges next spring.

    7)Clean moss and lichens from footpaths and walls. There are several commercial brands of cleaner available, but bleach is equally good. A power washer will make light work of the job!

    8)Before the month-end check apples and other stored fruits for signs of rotting and throw out damaged fruit for the birds.

    9)Plant tulip bulbs after the middle of the month to prevent the spread of Tulip Fire disease.

    10)Make sure you have checked the compost heap and the bonfire for hibernating animals before you light the bonfire on November 5th.!!

    11)Collect seeds of any plants you may wish to reproduce for next year. Cover seed-heads with a paper bag and tap them to release seed over time. Do not save seed from plants described as being of F1 (hybrid) origin.

    12)Cut back to ground level the canes of summer fruits such as Raspberries, Loganberries, Blackberries etc. as soon as fruiting is complete. Tie in the growth of this year’s new canes as these are your next year’s fruiting canes.

    13)From the middle of the month begin successional sowing of spring cabbage for winter harvest, and lettuce is sown under glass for use during the winter.

    14)Clean out bird boxes and sterilize them with boiling water.

    15)Insulate with bubble-wrap polythene, the pots of plants which may not be entirely hardy, or the container is a traditional frost susceptible clay pot.

    16)Don’t get carried away with autumn pruning! Plants such as Viburnum bodnantense, Lonicera fragrantissima, and the flowering cherry Prunus subhirtella ‘Autumnalis’, as these will carry sweetly scented pink flowers all the way through the winter.

    17)Lift and store dahlias if not already completed.

    Posted 2nd Nov 9:26am
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  9. Record year and new sales structure

    Record year and new sales structure

    We are celebrating a record year of sales, achieving a turnover of over £15 million for the first time in our 100th year history.

    In addition to the record turnover, the commercial sales department is celebrating a successful ten years in which revenue has grown by 50 per cent to more than £10 million.

    The team has recently appointed third-generation family member Luke Richardson as Sales Director, he said: “Commercial sales have exceeded all expectations, driven by strong performance in our core business and new custom. Reorganising our structure gives us a great foundation to improve our service offering, further incorporate new technology and drive sustainable growth. Despite the pandemic & Brexit, our upcoming annual budget is ambitious and reflects high confidence in the team.”

    The re-structure sees Iain Richardson focus on the general direction of the business, and he will retain a number of key accounts. Tony Coles heads up our all-important Key Accounts sector and is supported by Andrew Barker, who takes on the position of Key Accounts Manager.

    Vicky Newell returns to the business and assumes the responsibility of General Amenity Sales Manager with Jack Witham taking on home area sales, Hannah Smith the North and Laura Holmes the South. Corrina Mills is the companies Estimator and Ellie Richardson continues to work alongside the sales team as Marketing Manager.

    The sales team sell 6 million plants annually throughout the UK and are responsible for providing more than 10,000 quotes per year, up to 17,000 orders and 12,000 deliveries each year.

    Group MD Graham Richardson said: “Our success is primarily down to the hard work and dedication of all our staff, from the quote process right through to the lifting of orders and dispatch.

    Demand remains high as a consequence of a greater appetite for a greener world, considerable exposure from our improved website, expanded PR campaigns and significant social growth with an increase of 377% since 2017.

    These elements have played a key factor in the 30% increase of new customers. This is an exciting time for the business as Luke brings experience, motivation, compassion and an unrivalled knowledge of the market and our family business.”

    Get to know the team 

     

     

     

     

    Posted 29th Oct 1:57pm
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  10. Celebrating 30 years of quality accreditation

    Celebrating 30 years of quality accreditation

    We are celebrating achieving the BSI ISO 9001 Quality re-accreditation for the 30th year in a row.

    We have achieved the ISO 9001 Quality Management,  since 1991. We have also re-achieved ISO 14001 Environment Management standards since April 2010.

    Supplying 5-6 million plants throughout the UK each year, our plants embellish their surroundings and make a positive contribution to the environment.

    The ISO 9001 Quality Management is a clearly defined set of business processes, which defines Johnsons’ commitment to creating products and services following pre-defined standards. ISO 9001 is internationally recognised and one of the most popular international quality management systems.

    ISO 14001 is the international standard that specifies requirements for an effective environmental management system for businesses. It provides a framework that a business can follow of standards on environmental management. Integrating it with other management systems standards, like ISO 9001, can further assist in accomplishing organisational goals.

    We have also invested in 3 new electric 4 x 4 Hisun buggies this month, the robust vehicles will be trialled on the nurseries five sites with a view to replace all dumper trucks by 2025. One charge can last an impressive full working day and will be used to tow trailers and bespoke equipment.

    Graham Richardson, Managing Director at Johnsons of Whixley, said: “We are proud and delighted to have achieved the BSI ISO Quality accreditation for the 30th year in a row. It demonstrates our dedication to adhering to an external system of quality management and environmental standards to ensure the best quality products and services to current, new and potential customers. The new electric buggies are also a great addition and will reduce costs and further enhance our environmental credentials significantly in years to come.”

    Posted 6th Oct 2:42pm
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  11. Welcome back Vicky Newell

    Welcome back Vicky Newell

    Welcome back to a familiar face, Vicky Newell who re-joins our team as General Amenity Sales Manager. See what she says about her new role, and what it’s like to be back below

    1. How does it feel to be back?

    It is great to be back and to see so many familiar faces.

    2. Has much changed at Johnsons?

    Technology has changed considerable, being paperless takes some getting used to. The new quotation tool is amazing and enables many more amenity quotations to be done consistently whether they come in spreadsheet or PDF format.

    3. What will your new role involve?

    My time will be split 3 ways – managing the Amenity sales department, looking after my own Amenity accounts and generating more Amenity business (happy to listen if anyone has any great ideas on the last one !)

    4. What are you looking forward to most about your new role?

    I would like to make a difference and the more the team talks to our customers (new and old), we can improve our offer which will hopefully will generate new opportunities

    5. What do you think the challenges will be?

    Being able to fulfil customer expectations within the ever-decreasing timescales

    6. Tell us something we don’t know about you 

    I help out Knaresborough in Bloom, so can be seen planting, deadheading and watering the tubs and container in Knaresborough from time to time

    7. What do you like to get up to outside of work?

    I have 5 allotments with a friend, so that takes up most of my time on a Sunday, fighting against the weeds!

    8. Favourite food?
    I love Italian food but I am also partial to the odd slice or two of cake!

    Posted 5th Oct 1:11pm
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  12. The Growers Plantspo - May Shrubs

    The Growers Plantspo - May Shrubs

    Ceanothus varieties

    ?Flowers: May – June (depending on variety, varieties such as ‘Puget Blue’ start flowering in April, and others flower for longer than June)

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 3m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L, 20L + (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Convolvulus cneorum 

    ?Flowers: May – July

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 0.6m

     Soil: Poor to moderately fertile, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L (subject to availability)

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    Chaenomeles varieties such as ‘Jet Trail, ‘Crimson & Gold’ & ‘Nivalis’

    ?Flowers: March – May

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 2.5m

     Soil: Moderately fertile, moist but well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 3LD, 5L (subject to availability)

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    Choisya varieties such as ‘Aztec Pearl’, ‘Sundance’ & ‘White Dazzler’

    ?Flowers: May (often have a second flush in summer)

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 2.5m

     Soil: Moderately fertile,well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L (subject to availability)

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    Cornus varieties such as ‘ Sibirica’, ‘Aurea’ & ‘Flaviramea’

    ?Flowers: May – June

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 2.5m

     Soil: Any moderately fertile soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L (subject to availability)

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    Deutzia varieties like ‘Mont Rose’ and ‘Rosea’

    ?Flowers: April – June

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 1m

    Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

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    Euonymus varieties such as ‘Emerald & Gold’, ‘Emerald Gaiety & ‘Silver Queen’

    ?Flowers: May- June

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 1m (depending on the variety)

    Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L , 5L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

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    Exochorda x macrantha varieties such as ‘The Bride’ & ‘Niagara’

    ?Flowers: April – May

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 2m

    Soil: Moist, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 5L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

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    Kerria japonica ‘Pleniflora’

    ?Flowers: March-May

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 2m

    Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 10L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

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    Magnolia x soulangeana and the variety ‘Susan’

    ?Flowers: March-May

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 6m

    Soil: Moist, well-drained, acidic soil

     Pot size: 3L, 5L 10L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

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    Osmanthus x burkwoodii & delavayi

    ?Flowers: April-May

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 3m

    Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L 10L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

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    Potentilla varieties such as ‘Red Robin’ ‘Lovely pink’ ‘Goldfinger’ ‘Abbotswood’ and ‘Tangerine’ 

    ?Flowers: May – October

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 1m depending on the variety

    Soil: moderately fertile, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 7.5L, 10L  (depending on variety and subject to availability)

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    Pyracantha ‘Saphyr’ varieties in ‘Red’, Yellow’ & ‘Orange’

    ?Flowers: May

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 3m depending on the variety

    Soil: any fertile, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 3LD, 5L  (depending on variety and subject to availability)

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    Pieris varieties such as ‘Flaming Silver’ ‘Forest Flame’ and ‘Little Heath’

    ?Flowers:  April – May

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 3m depending on the variety

    Soil: any fertile, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

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    Rhododendron in variety 

    ?Flowers:  May – June

    ? Position: Full sun –  Partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 2.5m depending on the variety

    Soil:Moist, well-drained, humus-rich, acid soil or ericaceous compost

     Pot size: 3L, 5L, 7.5L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

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    Ribes sanguineum varieties such as ‘King Edward’, ‘Pulborough Scarlet’

    ?Flowers:  April – May

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 3m depending on the variety

    Soil: Moderately fertile, moist, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 2LD, 3L, 3LD, 5L, 10L  (depending on variety and subject to availability)

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    Rosmarinus officinalis and the variety ‘Jessops Upright’

    ?Flowers:  May-June

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 2m depending on the variety

    Soil:  well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L,  5L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

     

    Syringa varieties 

    ?Flowers: May-June

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 4m depending on the variety

    Soil: Fertile, moist, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L3L, 5L, 10L, 12L, 20L + (depending on variety and subject to availability)

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    Weigela varieties

    ?Flowers: May-June

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 2.5m depending on the variety

    Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L3L, 5L, 10L  (depending on variety and subject to availability)

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    Posted 17th May 11:21am
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  13. The Growers Choice - Acers for autumn

    The Growers Choice - Acers for autumn

    Acers (Japanese maples) are best known for their vivid autumn leaves that turn various colours during October, including fiery red, orange, yellow and brown. They make a perfect focal point brightening up dark corners of the garden, and even grow well in pots.

     

    Acer palmatum ‘Aureum’ 

    A medium-sized maple with stunning yellow leaves in spring followed by yellow lime coloured leaves in summer and shades of orange and red in autumn.

    ? Position: Partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 4 metres

    ? Spread: Up to 4 metres

    Acer palmatum ‘Garnet’ 

    Has fantastic bright scarlet leaves during autumn that is a garnet stone colour throughout spring and summer, it’s slightly more compact than other varieties so makes a great addition to a patio pot or planted in a smaller garden.

    ? Position: Partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 2 metres

    ? Spread: Up to 2 metres

    Acer ‘Ryusen’ 

    Is a great compact weeping Japanese maple variety with mid to bright green leaves in spring and summer that turn an orange-red in autumn.

    ? Position: Partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 2 metres

    ? Spread: Up to 2 metres

     

    Acer palmatum ‘Firecracker’ 

    Purple and red shades in spring that have an outstanding autumn colour show of brilliant hues of oranges and reds.

    ?Position: Partial shade

    ?Height: Up to 4 metres

    ?Spread: Up to 4 metres

    Acer palmatum ‘Orange Dream’

    A small-sized tree with a dark orange edge and yellow centre in autumn turning to shades of green during the summer.

    ?Position: Partial shade

    ?Height: Up to 4 metres

    ?Spread: Up to 3 metres

    Acer ‘Shaina’ 

    A compact variety perfect for smaller gardens or even a patio pot. Displays of shades of red throughout the seasons and a crimson red in autumn.

    ?Position: Partial shade

    ?Height: Up to 4 metres

    ?Spread: Up to 3 metres

    Acer ‘Sango Kaku’

    Known for its coral-pink stems and lush green leaves in summer that turn a soft yellow in autumn this will make a great feature tree.

    ?Position: Partial shade

    ?Height: Up to 4 metres

    ?Spread: Up to 2 metres

     

    In need of more inspiration for your next project? head back to our solutions page here

    Posted 25th Aug 1:31pm
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  14. Planters bring iconic Quayside to life this summer

    Planters bring iconic Quayside to life this summer

    Newcastle’s iconic Quayside on the River Tyne has recently been brought to life as part of the NE1 Summer in the City project which has transformed a number of outdoor spaces across the city.

    As part of the project sixty-nine, large planters have been installed along the Quayside. The planters have been made from upcycled concrete manhole rings, which have been decorated and filled with shrubs, herbaceous, grasses and trees, alongside various art installations to enhance the planting design.

    Our customer Southern Green Ltd was commissioned to design and install the planters by their client NE1 Ltd with the planting interventions designed and delivered within 10 weeks including the procurement of all materials. JCC Engineers, Trevor Atkinson Landscapes, AH Events, Glebe House Vintage, Merchant no.1, RASKL Studio and The Traveller and the Bear were also part of the team brought together by NE1 to deliver this ambitious project.

    Southern Green Ltd called upon Johnsons to supply a large number of plants including Carex Testacea, Achillea ‘Cloth of Gold’ Hebe ‘Sutherlandii’, Lavandula ‘Munstead’, Rudbeckia ‘Goldsturm’, Salvia ‘Caradonna’, Astilbe ‘Fanal’, Miscanthus ‘Gracillimus, Campanula ‘Perla Blue’ and Verbena bonariensis.

    Other pop-ups installed throughout Newcastle’s city centre have included a large open-air cinema Screen on the Green at Old Eldon Square,  ‘Wave-Field’, an installation of 8 seesaws,  the Urban Garden at Wesley Square, a 75m long pavement vinyl by artist Tim Gresham, 3D Street Art by 3D Joe & Max and even water activities on the river.

    The ‘Summer in the City’ project aims to encourage tourists and locals into the city, with new attractions and activities to enjoy for all age groups.

    Alex Slack, Head of Special Projects at NE1 Ltd said: “The Summer in the City project and associated Quayside interventions are the result of months of hard work, dedication and commitment of everybody involved. Emerging from lockdown and faced with both material and labour shortages (as well as a relatively short lead in) it was vital that we had the right people in place to deliver our vision. The creativity and innovative thinking of Southern Green coupled with a first-rate service from Johnsons enabled us to achieve something truly remarkable despite numerous challenges. We are absolutely thrilled with the result and are enormously grateful to all who contributed.”

    Liam Haggarty, Southern Green Director, said: “It has been a privilege to be involved in yet another fantastic and innovative project working alongside friends and colleagues at NE1. The project is an exemplar for what can be achieved with a ‘can do’ attitude and a fantastic team of people all willing to go the extra mile from start to finish.

    Johnsons are always great to work with and provide the highest quality plant stock. They agreed to a nursery visit at very short notice, and then collated and delivered everything to our exacting specification within a matter of days, which was one of the key factors to the successful delivery of the works on site – thank you again to Tony and his team.”

    It was great to get involved in this project and bring the Quayside to life this summer. Liam came to the Nursery to choose the plants required.  The aim was to get as much colour in as possible with good quality plants, each batch of plants was tagged to indicate the grade required to be lifted. All of the plants were sent to the site on trollies to avoid damage to the plants and particularly the flowers.

    This is not the first ‘pop-up’ project johnsons has been involved with, click here to see a pop-up garden we supplied in Manchester for a well-known coffee brand.

     

    Posted 23rd Aug 3:55pm
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  15. The Growers Choice: Long-flowering plants

    The Growers Choice: Long-flowering plants

    If you are wanting your garden to bloom throughout the year, be sure to include long-flowering varieties in your projects from Vincas to Erysimum. Below is a list of some of our favourite long-flowering varieties.

    Erysimum Bowle’s Mauve

    A long-flowering semi-evergreen with narrow, grey-green leaves. This perennial produces spikes of purple flowers from late February to July and will make a great addition to a long flowering sunny border.

    ? Flowers: February – July

    ?Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 0.75m

    ? Soil: poor to moderately fertile, well-drained soil

    Available in 2L pots.

    Vinca minor

    One of our favourite ground cover plants is the evergreen Vinca Minor. It is well-known for its capability in ground-covering flaunting its star-like blue flowers which can be seen from April to September. Planting the Vinca Minor in very dry soil exposed to full sun or partial shade will allow them to flourish.

    ? Flowers: April – September

    ?Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 0.2 metres

    ? Soil: Very dry soil

    Available in 2L pots.

    Persicaria ‘Darjeeling Red’

    Is a semi-evergreen perennial, well-known for its crimson upright flowers. It can be seen in the Autumn months from September to November, growing up to half a metre tall. For best results, soil moisture must be moist but well-drained.

    ? Flowers: June-October

    ?Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 0.5 metres

    ? Soil: Moist but well-drained

    Available in 2L and 5L pots.

    Geranium varieties

    A perfect plant doing well in partial shade to full sun, it’s great for underplanting or filling in any empty gaps in your border, adding beautiful purple flowers from June through to October.

    ? Flowers: June – October

    ?Position: Sun – Partial Shade

    ? Height: Up to 0.6m

    ? Soil: fertile, well-drained soil.

    Salvia varieties such as ‘Caradonna’

    Violet blue flowers grow on purple stems from June to October. Happiest in a sunny position in a well-drained border. The flowers are well-loved by bees and butterflies.

    ?Flowers: June – October (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 1.2m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moderately fertile, moist but well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2l, 3L,5L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    Fuchsia varieties such as ‘Tom Thumb’ ‘Genii’ and ‘Mrs Popple’

    A great addition to a sunny partial shade area of a project. They would even look great in a hanging basket.

    ?Flowers: June-October

    ? Position: Full sun  or partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 1m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, moist well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    Potentilla varieties such as ‘Red Robin’ ‘Lovely pink’ ‘Goldfinger’ ‘Abbotswood’ and ‘Tangerine’

    ?Flowers: May – October

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 1m depending on the variety

    Soil: moderately fertile, well-drained soil

    Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 7.5L, 10L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    Agastache varieties such as ‘Morello’, ‘Little Adder’ & ‘Blue Fortune’

    ?Flowers:  July – October (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 1m (depending on the variety)

    Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L. 3L

    Verbena bonariensis

    Tall branching stems with clusters of lilac-purple flowers from June to September are ideal for the front or middle of a border in full sun.

    ? Flowers: June – September (depending on variety)

    ?Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 2m  (depending on variety)

    ? Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

    Available in 2l  pots (depending on variety) 

    Other long-flowering varieties you could use include Lavender, Hypericum, Erigeron, Penstemon, Nepeta and Buddleia.

    For more garden inspiration, head to our solutions page by clicking here

    Posted 11th Aug 10:33am
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  16. The Growers Choice: Hedging for birds

    The Growers Choice: Hedging for birds

    Encourage birds into your garden projects by planting bird-friendly species such as Ilex aquifolium and Crataegus monogyna. See our bird-friendly hedging favourites below.

    1) Ilex aquifolium (Holly) is definitely a bird’s favourite. Its dense prickly leaves offer windproof shelter along with berries for a Christmas feast. Blackbirds and thrushes are usually the first to strip a holly bush of its berries.

    Available as root balls in the winter and container plants in a multitude of sizes throughout the year.

    ?Flowers: June- July

    Fruits: October – January

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 20 metres

    ? Soil: well-drained, moist, moderately fertile, humus-rich soil

    2) Crataegus monogyna (Hawthorn) berries are a favourite for Chaffinches, Starlings, Blackbirds and Greenfinches. The leaves are the food plant for caterpillars of many moth species, providing food for baby birds in spring.

    ?Flowers: May – June

    Fruits: September – November

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 6 metres

    ? Soil: Any soil (apart from water-logged)

    We have a great selection of bare root hedging available from 40-60cm tall to 175-200cm tall from November to March.

    3) Prunus spinosa (Blackthorn) is used by birds to nest among its dense thorny branches and feast on caterpillars and other insects on its leaves, and feast on the sloe berries in autumn.

    ?Flowers: March

    Fruits: September – November

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 4 metres

    ? Soil: Any soil (apart from water-logged)

    Available in container pots throughout the year or in bare-root form come November – March. 

    4) Prunus padus (bird cherry) Provides a spring feast for pollinators. Its cherries are eaten by birds such as blackbirds and song thrushes and other mammals such as a dormouse.

    ?Flowers: March

    Fruits: August

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 5 metres

    ? Soil: Will tolerate most soil types

    You can purchase this variety from us throughout the year as a container-grown plant or as a bare root one from November – March. 

    5) Cotoneaster varieties 

    Cotoneaster branches are always full of small red berries from autumn onwards and provide great shelter for a nesting site. They are popular with thrushes, Blackbirds and Waxwings.

    ?Flowers: May

    Fruits: Autumn

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 6 metres

    ? Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

    Available in a number of pot sizes from 2L to 10L.

    6) Alnus glutinosa (Alder) seeds are eaten by birds such as Siskin, redpoll and goldfinches, as well as its catkins providing an early source of nectar and pollen for bees.

    ?Flowers: February – April

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 10 metres

    ? Soil: Will tolerate most soil types

    This hedging plant is available in container pots throughout the year and in various bare-root sizes from November-March. 

    Other hedging varieties to consider to help encourage birds into your garden include Pyracantha, Acer campestre, Dog Rose and Malus sylvestris.

    Posted 10th Aug 3:22pm
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  17. Memorial bench pays tribute to past employee

    Memorial bench pays tribute to past employee

    Two employees Krzysztof Scislowski and Tom Watkins, have recently created a memorial bench for a previous employee, Dean Yarrow using pallets.

    Earlier this year, we were notified of a fatal car accident on the A165 near Bridlington, which involved Dean, his wife and toddler Henry. Dean and his wife sadly died at the scene while their son was treated for minor injuries.

    Dean was a well-loved hard-working member of the Johnsons team for 3 years from 2016-2019 and was Deputy Manager at our Whixley site, working closely with Krzysztof and Tom.

    Krzystof and Tom are some of many Johnsons employees with fond memories of Dean and specifically remember him eating his lunch sat on nursery pallets which inspired their pallet bench memorial idea.

    Deputy Cattal Manager, Tom Watkins said:

    “Dean was an unforgettable character; his knowledge and passion for plants were inspiring to me when working with him.

    His ability to always make me laugh both in and outside of work was everything you needed in a good friend.

    This bubbly persona definitely shines through in his son, Henry, who is also a likeness of his mother in that sense. The memorial bench Krzysztof made is a great place for others to share the memory of Dean.”

    Whixley site Manager Krzysztof, said: “

    Dean was a helpful, funny, loved friend not only at work but also after. He always had a smile and was ready to help

    and such will stay in my memory, a lot of the things we did together at Whixley will remind me of him.”

    Group Managing Director, Graham Richardson added: “Dean was a genuinely likeable character who was a valued colleague at Roecliffe, Whixley and in the business generally.

    There is little we can do to ‘soften’ the impact of this tragic accident – memories are all we have and our memorial bench is a fitting tribute.”

     

    Posted 9th Aug 2:33pm
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  18. A new role for Jack Witham

    A new role for Jack Witham

    Congratulations to Jack Witham, who has joined our Amenity Sales team as a Junior Sales Executive Find out what he had to say about his new role below.

    1. What will your new role at Johnsons involve?

    I am going into the Amenity sales team, so it involves several things to do with the Amenity side. Doing quotes is what I have started learning, but it also includes sorting sales orders and dealing with customers, new and old.

    2. How long have you been a part of the Johnsons team?

    I started at Johnsons when I was 17 during the summer holidays whilst I was at six form college. From then, I’d regularly come back in between term times whilst studying at university. After finishing university last year, I stayed on the nursery until taking this new role. My role was predominantly being an amenity lifter, preparing orders for customers making sure everything was to a high standard.

    3. What are you most looking forward to in your new role?

    Going into a different job role within the company is what I am most looking forward to, and working on a range of different things. This is my first job in an office, so it will be interesting to see what it is like inside.

    4. What do you think the challenges will be?

    Doing a job completely different from anything I have done before and learning all the different tips and techniques on computers. My I.T skills are O.K, but there is definitely room for improvement.

    5. Do you have any hobbies?

    I am a big cricket fan which shouldn’t come as much surprise working here. I am the Whixley cricket club captain, playing every weekend in summer when it doesn’t rain. I also have a membership at Yorkshire cricket club and watch them a lot when I can. I think that’s the only hobby I actually have.

    6. Favourite subject at school?

    Shockingly, it was P.E. Unfortunately, we hardly ever played cricket at school, and I wasn’t very good at other sports. I scored an own goal during my football examination, which brought my markdown.

    7. Favourite food?

    I love a Lamb pasanda from an Indian. It has to be the best meal out there. Any Indian food, though, is nice. Chinese is also very good. To be honest, I like a lot of food, just not mushrooms and cauliflower.

    8. Favourite holiday destination? 

    Barcelona is a wonderful city. It’s got everything, plenty of bars, a lovely beach, and lots of Estrella. I’d love to go back again if I get the chance to. Hopefully travelling between countries will be easier soon and I can go abroad again.

    Amenity Sales Manager, Tony Coles said: I would like to welcome Jack into the Amenity Sales Team, Jack brings with him the experience of working out on the Nursery lifting plants for the Amenity sector. I am confident  Jack will become an integral part of the team looking after customers and their requirements in the future and I look forward to working with him.

     

    Posted 4th Aug 8:56am
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  19. Welcome to the team Jacob Heap

    Welcome to the team Jacob Heap

    A warm welcome to Jacob Heap, who has joined our cash & carry team for work experience this August to help fund his racing car.

    1) Tell us about yourself:

    I am 15 years old and about to go into year 11. I race cars as my hobby but hope to do it professionally.

    2)What do you like to get up to outside of school?

    Meet up and go away on holiday with friends. I work on my race car. I work with my dad to help pay for racing.

    3)How did you get into racing driving?

    I tried football and hated it, so my dad bought me a go-kart, and I raced go-karts for 7 years and then decided I wanted to race cars.

    4)Favourite race experience and track?

    My favourite track is Snetterton, and my favourite race experience was there 4 weeks ago when I started in 14th and battled to get to 6th.

    5)What will your work experience money go towards?

    It will help fund my racing car.

    6) Where do you hope to be in five years time?

    Racing in cars at a higher level, winning championships and being as successful as I can.

    To find out more about Jacob and his racing, click here to visit his website

     

    Posted 9th Aug 2:05pm
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  20. August Gardening Reminders 2021

    August Gardening Reminders 2021

    The lighter evenings are slowly on their way out as we enjoy the last month of summer. However, there’s still plenty to be doing this August, including dead-heading, cutting back and dividing. Check out our August gardening hints and tips put together by Chairman and horticulturist John Richardson below.

    1) When going on holiday and concerned about indoor containers being watered, try placing a full bucket of water on the garage floor and placing your pots around it on their own saucers. Using a piece of thick wet string about the consistency of a thick bootlace, tie one end to a piece of old cutlery and place it in the bucket. Push the other end of the string into the compost in one of the pots.  Place strings from the cutlery to all the other pots and cross fingers!!  It works for me !!

    2) Complete the lifting of last seasons bulbs and dry them off naturally in light woven sacks for maximum ventilation.

    3) Keep dead-heading the really good flowering plants, and don’t allow them to dry out. This should encourage new flowers and stop them from setting seed. Where heavy watering has been applied, consider giving the plants a top-dressing of general fertilizer, either dry or liquid, to keep them growing well into the autumn.

    4) Cut back the long whippy growths of Wisteria to within 3 buds of the old wood if they are not required to extend the area covered by the plant.

    5) Keep an eye on the whole garden and spray or pick off pests on Dahlias and Chrysanthemums in particular.

    6) Collect and dispose of the first fallen fruits from apple trees. Many will be damaged and prone to spreading diseases such as brown rot.

    7) Divide and replant rhizomatous Iris, and layer Carnations and Pinks. Peg them into moist soil after carefully cracking a small section of the stem. Ensure the treated area remains in moist soil.

    8) Continue to water new lawns recently established. I suggest that it would be better to leave further lawn development until after mid-September when the weather is cooler.

    9) It is important to provide water for wildlife in the dry months, a substantial bird bath plus a large saucer of water let into the ground for mice, hedgehogs, insects etc., will be much appreciated!

    10) Collect seeds of any plants you may wish to reproduce for next year. Cover seed-heads with a paper bag and tap them to release seed over time. Do not save seed from plants described as being of F1 origin.

    11) Cut back to ground level the canes of summer fruits such as Raspberries, Loganberries, Blackberries etc., as soon as fruiting is complete. Tie in the growth of this year’s new canes as these are your next year’s fruiting canes.

    12)From the middle of the month begin successional sowing of spring cabbage for winter harvest and lettuce sown under glass for use during the winter

    13) Make sure to leave time to be able to sit back and enjoy the late August evenings before the need to start winter digging and tree pruning becomes an urgent matter!

    Posted 6th Aug 2:36pm
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  21. September Gardening Reminders 2021

    September Gardening Reminders 2021

    The mornings now have a fresh feel to them, but overnight temperatures are still staying above 10 degrees. It really does feel as though we are coming to the end of the summer now, but there’s plenty to be doing in the garden this month; below are some hints and tips put together by Chairman and horticulturist John Richardson.

    1)The first 10 days of September is the last time to be taking cuttings of tender perennials such as pelargoniums and fuchsias. Roots will form much quicker before the cooler weather sets in. It is better to take cuttings at this late stage to root them round the edge of a pot and leave them in the pot until transplanting next spring. Alternatively, bring the old plants under cover in a cool but frost-free room and take cuttings early next year.

    2)Have you ever thought of buying a greenhouse? Now is a good time to buy at a discounted price, with the whole winter to erect it and have it ship-shape for the start of next spring.

    3)Time to check bigger trees around the garden; September can be a windy month and well worth the knowledge that boughs are not likely to come crashing down on the house, the garden and the new greenhouse in the winter sales.

    4) If you have time to spare on the weekend, take a notebook around the garden and note those plants which are happy in their location, are growing too big, have the wrong colour combination with neighbouring plants, or really need more space. It will make your winter sort-out in the garden much easier.

    5) Planting new shrubs in autumn has the benefit of warm soil to get the plants established before winter and the soil is usually moist; delay bare-root tree planting until November and be sure to install a stake at the time of planting. Always put the stake on the windward side and secure it with a proper tree time.

    6) September is a good month to plant spring-flowering bulbs, but leave tulips until November, as this will help prevent the fungal disease ‘tulip fire’. If you find mice digging up your crocus bulbs, cover them with fine chicken wire, which won’t affect grass mowing but should dissuade mice.

    7)If you have heavy soil, dig over the garden borders later this month as the bedding plants need to be removed. This will make digging easier as the soil will not be at full water capacity as in later months.

    8) Crocosmias form large mounds of roots and corms over the years, separate them with 2 forks by pulling them apart, or remove the soil and untangle them with the help of a hosepipe jet.

    9) Continue to trim fast-growing hedging, and don’t overlook the weeds in the hedge bottoms.

    10)Newly planted perennials will do well when planted over the next 6 weeks. Give the roots of new plants a good soaking before planting, and firm in well to the original depth and place a good mulch around the plant to prevent moisture loss and winter frost damage to young roots.

    11) During this month and next, the lawn can be cut less frequently but will really benefit from mechanical scarifying or the regular use of a spring tine rake to remove the old ‘thatch’. Aerating the lawn by means of a machine or a garden fork will work wonders, in conjunction with a specific lawn weed-killer and an autumn lawn fertilizer dressing.

    Posted 16th Sep 3:27pm
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  22. October Gardening Reminders 2021

    October Gardening Reminders 2021

    The temperatures have dropped and trees & shrubs are changing colour  –  autumn is officially here, but there’s still plenty to be doing in the garden this month from planting bulbs to taking cuttings; below are some hints and tips put together by Chairman and horticulturist John Richardson.

    1) Give conifer hedges a final trim and finish planting evergreen shrubs while the soil is still warm, and new roots will develop quickly.

    2) Lift and store carrots and potatoes. Cut back strong stems of tall shrubs like lavatera and Buddleia to half their length to prevent winter damage. Complete the cutting back to 15 inches in February/March.

    3) Collect the seed of those plants you may wish to increase and will come true from seed. Store seed in paper bags in a sealed container on the bottom shelf of a refrigerator. If unsure when to sow the seed, sow half on the collection and the other half in the spring.

    4) At the end of October give the glasshouses and frames a thorough clean both inside and outside. Scrub down the benches with a mild disinfectant before hosing down the entire area.

    5) If you have electricity in the glasshouse, check that the earth-breaker is undamaged and clean.

    6) Fix grease bands to the trunks of apple and pear trees.

    7) Clean out ponds and water features, and remove water pumps for the winter.

    8) Repair broken fences, patios, trellises, steps, fall pipes and walls.

    9) Take hardwood cuttings of forsythia, deutzia, honeysuckle, jasmine, Virginia creeper, holly, privet, cotoneaster, poplar, willow, gooseberries, blackcurrants etc., at the end of the month.

    10) Make several collections through the month of fallen leaves, and store them in a wire-netting enclosed area to ensure they rot down over winter. Do not leave fallen leaves on the lawn.

    11) Clean out leaves from around alpine plants. If permanently outside and not in a cold frame, cover with a pinned down sheet of glass over winter to prevent the plants from becoming water-logged.

    12) Lift Dahlias, Gladioli, and other tender perennials when temperatures fall sharply and store them in a frost-free place.

    13) This is a good month to lay turf providing the ground has been firmed, raked, levelled and weeded.

    14) If the weather warms up at the end of the month, take the opportunity to prepare compost and boxes for sowing half-hardy annuals by the end of the month. You should have a heat source available for frost prevention on cold nights

    15) Be sure to have a stock of sand or salt for very frosty mornings when paths and roads are slippery.

    16) Plant new daffodils, but don’t plant tulips until mid-November to reduce the risk of Tulip Fire Disease.

    17) When planting new trees larger than 2m., place a diagonal stake into the prevailing wind to prevent the tree from leaning over in the first year.

    18) Remember, when selecting shrubs, birds don’t like yellow berries!!

    19) lift and divide rhubarb crowns at 5-year intervals, a spade is the best implement to use!

    Interested in plants that are looking good this October, click here to view

     

     

    Posted 4th Oct 1:01pm
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  23. The Growers Plantspo - August Herbaceous

    The Growers Plantspo - August Herbaceous

    Are you in need of some inspiration for your next garden project and after some late-flowering herbaceous plants? check out some of our favourite August flowering varieties from Anemone to Rudbeckia.

    Achillea varieties such as ‘Terracotta’, ‘Cloth of Gold’ and ‘Moon Dust

    Achilleas are a great addition to a mixed border or cottage garden in full sun – partial shade with flat-topped flowers that bloom from June – September with many cultivars and colours to choose from ranging from yellow to white and pink.

    ?Flowers:  June-September (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade (depending on variety)

    ? Height: Up to 1m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moist, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Anemone varieties such as ‘September Charm’, ‘Honorine Jobert’ & ‘Hadspen Abundance’

    ?Flowers:  August – October (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 1.2m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moist, fertile, humus-rich soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Alchemilla Mollis

    ?Flowers:  June-September (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 0.6m

    Soil: Humus-rich soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L

    ———————————————————————————————

    Alstromeria varieties such as ‘White Magic’, ‘Indian Summer’ and ‘Inticancha Maya’

    ?Flowers:  June-September (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 0.9m (depending on the variety)

    Soil: Fertile, moist, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 3L

    ——————————————————————————————–

    Agastache varieties such as ‘Morello’, ‘Little Adder’ & ‘Blue Fortune’

    ?Flowers:  July – October (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 1m (depending on the variety)

    Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L. 3L

    ——————————————————————————————–

    Agapanthus varieties such as Africanus, ‘Twister’ and ‘Polar Ice’

    ?Flowers:  July – September (depending on the variety)

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 1m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, moist, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L  (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ——————————————————————————————–

    Astrantia varieties such as ‘Claret’, ‘Hadspen Blood’ and ‘Rosea’

    ?Flowers: June – August (depends on the variety)

    ? Position: Full sun -partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 1m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, moist, preferably humus-rich soil

     Pot size: 3L

    ———————————————————————————————

    Aster varieties such as ‘Monch’, ‘Bahamas’ & ‘Barbados’

    ?Flowers: August – October (depends on the variety)

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 0.9m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Well-drained, moderately fertile soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L

    ———————————————————————————————

    Campanula varieties such as ‘Perla Blue’, ‘Perla White’ & ‘White Clips’

    ?Flowers: July – September (depends on the variety)

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 0.3m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moist, well-drained, soil

     Pot size: 2L

    ———————————————————————————————

    Coreopsis varieties such as ‘Limerock Ruby’, ‘Golden Sphere’ and ‘Sunkiss’

    ?Flowers: June – September (depends on the variety)

    ? Position: Full sun -partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 0.5m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 3L

    ———————————————————————————————

    Crocosmia varieties such as ‘Lucifer’ and ‘George Davidson’

    ?Flowers: August – September

    ? Position: Full sun -partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 1.2m (depending on variety)

    Soil:Moderately fertile, humus-rich, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 3L, 5L

    ———————————————————————————————

    Dahlia varieties such as ‘Happy Days Pink’, ‘Happy Days Red’ and ‘Happy Days Yellow’

    ?Flowers: June – September (depends on the variety)

    ? Position: Full sun -partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 0.5m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 3L

    ———————————————————————————————

    Echinacea varieties such as ‘White Swan’, ‘Magnus’ and ‘Alba’

    ?Flowers: July – September

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 1m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Most soils, except very dry or boggy

     Pot size: 2L, 3L

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    Erigeron varieties such as ‘Sea Breeze’ and Erigeron karvinskianus

    ?Flowers: May – October (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 0.5m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L

    ———————————————————————————————

    Eryngium varieties such as ‘Neptune’s Gold’

    ?Flowers: July – August

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 0.5m (depending on variety)

    Soil: dry, well-drained, poor to moderately fertile soil

     Pot size: 2L

    ———————————————————————————————

    Geranium varieties such as ‘Rozanne’ and ‘Max Frei’ 

    ?Flowers: June – October (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 0.6m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L

    ———————————————————————————————

    Geum varieties such as ‘Totally Tangerine’, ‘Cosmopolitan’ and ‘Sunrise’

    ?Flowers: June – August (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 0.6m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, moist, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 3L

    ———————————————————————————————

    Helenium varieties such as ‘Moerheim Beauty’, ‘Short and Sassy’ and ‘The Bishop’ 

    ?Flowers: July – August (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 1m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, moist, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L

    ———————————————————————————————

    Leucanthemum ‘Banana Cream’ and ‘Snow Lady’

    ?Flowers: June – September (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 1m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moderately fertile, moist but well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L

    ———————————————————————————————

    Liatris varieties such as ‘Alba’, ‘Floristan’ & ‘Kobold’

    ?Flowers: August – September (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 1m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moderately-fertile, reliably moist soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L

    ———————————————————————————————

    Monarda varieties such as ‘Balmy Lilac’ and ‘Balmy Pink’

    ?Flowers: July – August

    ? Position: Full sun- partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 0.4m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, moist, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2l, 3L (depending on variety and subject to availability).

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    Nepeta varieties such as ‘Six Hills Giant’, ‘Walkers Low’ and ‘Junior Walker’

    ?Flowers: June – September (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun- partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 0.9m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moist, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2l, 3L, 5L (depending on variety and subject to availability).

    ———————————————————————————————

    Penstemon varieties 

    ?Flowers: July – October

    ? Position: Full sun- partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 1m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, moist, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2l, 3L (depending on variety and subject to availability).

    ———————————————————————————————

    Persicaria varieties such as ‘Darjeeling Red’, ‘Superba’ and ‘Delgado’

    ?Flowers: June – October (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun- partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 1m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Any moist soil

     Pot size: 2l (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Perovskia varieties such as ‘Blue Spire’, ‘Lacey Blue’ & ‘Little Spire’

    ?Flowers: August – September (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 1.2m (depending on variety)

    Soil:Well-drained, poor to moderately fertile

     Pot size: 2l, 5L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Rudbeckia varieties such as ‘Goldsturm’, ‘Maya’ & ‘Sunbeckia Mia’

    ?Flowers: August – October (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 0.8m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moderately fertile, preferably heavy but well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2l, 3L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Salvia varieties such as ‘Caradonna’, ‘Cherry Lips and ‘Sensation White’

    ?Flowers: June – October (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 1.2m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moderately fertile, moist but well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2l, 3L,5L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Sanguisorba varieties such as ‘Tanma’ & ‘Little Angel’

    ?Flowers: June – September (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 0.6m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Poor-to-average, moist, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2l, 3L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Scabiosa varieties such as ‘Butterfly Blue’, ‘Flutter Deep Blue’ and ‘Flutter Deep Pink’

    ?Flowers: June – September (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 0.5m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moderately fertile, well-drained, neutral to slightly alkaline soil

     Pot size: 2l, 3L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Sedum varieties such as ‘Touchdown Teak, ‘Autumn Joy’ ‘Herbstfreude’ & ‘Frosted Fire’

    ?Flowers:  August – November (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 0.6m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moderately fertile, well-drained, neutral to slightly alkaline soil

     Pot size: 2l, 3L, 5L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Verbena varieties such as bonariensis and  ‘Lollipop’

    ?Flowers: July – September

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 2m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moderately fertile, moist but well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Veronica varieties such as ‘Anniversary Blue’ 

    ?Flowers: June – August

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 1m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moderately fertile, moist but well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Posted 29th Jul 2:10pm
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  24. The Growers Plantspo - October Herbaceous

    The Growers Plantspo - October Herbaceous

    While many herbaceous plants have been and gone there’s still a few in flower during early autumn from Anemone to Geranium, add to your next project for late summer-early autumn colour.

    Anemone varieties such as ‘September Charm’, ‘Honorine Jobert’ & ‘Hadspen Abundance’

    ?Flowers:  August – October (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 1.2m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moist, fertile, humus-rich soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Agastache varieties such as ‘Morello’, ‘Little Adder’ & ‘Blue Fortune’

    ?Flowers:  July – October (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 1m (depending on the variety)

    Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L. 3L

    ——————————————————————————————–

    Aster varieties such as ‘Monch’, ‘Bahamas’ & ‘Barbados’

    ?Flowers: August – October (depends on the variety)

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 0.9m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Well-drained, moderately fertile soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L

    ———————————————————————————————

    Geranium varieties such as ‘Rozanne’ and ‘Max Frei’ 

    ?Flowers: June – October (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 0.6m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L

    ———————————————————————————————

    Penstemon varieties 

    ?Flowers: July – October

    ? Position: Full sun- partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 1m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, moist, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2l, 3L (depending on variety and subject to availability).

    ———————————————————————————————

    Persicaria varieties such as ‘Darjeeling Red’, ‘Superba’ and ‘Delgado’

    ?Flowers: June – October (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun- partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 1m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Any moist soil

     Pot size: 2l (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Rudbeckia varieties such as ‘Goldsturm’, ‘Maya’ & ‘Sunbeckia Mia’

    ?Flowers: August – October (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 0.8m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moderately fertile, preferably heavy but well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2l, 3L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Salvia varieties such as ‘Caradonna’, ‘Cherry Lips and ‘Sensation White’

    ?Flowers: June – October (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 1.2m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moderately fertile, moist but well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2l, 3L,5L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Sedum varieties such as ‘Touchdown Teak, ‘Autumn Joy’ ‘Herbstfreude’ & ‘Frosted Fire’

    ?Flowers:  August – November (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 0.6m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moderately fertile, well-drained, neutral to slightly alkaline soil

     Pot size: 2l, 3L, 5L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Posted 16th Sep 2:39pm
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  25. The Growers Plantspo - November Interest

    The Growers Plantspo - November Interest

    Your garden projects don’t have to be boring this  November, there’s plenty of autumn-winter interest plants around that are sure to brighten up your projects from Mahonia to Viburnum.

    Cornus varieties such as ‘Midwinter Fire’, and ‘Sibrica’ 

    Cornus are known for their coloured stems that are revealed when their leaves fall. Shades of red, yellow and orange stems are available.

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 3m (depending on the variety)

    ? Width: Up to 2m (depending on the variety)

    Soil:  moderately fertile soil

    Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L,  10L ( subject to availability and the variety)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Cotoneaster  varieties such as’ horizontalis’

    Berries appear on varieties such as ‘horizontalis’ and ‘Coral Beauty’ during the autumn period, in late spring- early summer they are filled with small creamy white flowers.

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ?Flowers:  May-June  (depending on variety)

    ? Height: Up to 2m (depending on the variety)

    ? Width: Up to 1.5m (depending on the variety)

    Soil:  fertile, well-drained soil

    ———————————————————————————————

    Euonymus Alatus

    A bushy dense deciduous shrub with green leaves that turn to shades of strawberry red during autumn.

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 2m

    ? Width: Up to 3m

    Soil:  well-drained soil

    Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L,  10L ( subject to availability)

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    Euonymus europaeus

    Dark green leaves turn to a spectacular blazing scarlet colour during autumn and its summer flowers are replaced with orange-pink winged fruit which remains long after leaves have fallen.

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to3m

    ? Width: Up to 2.5m

    Soil:  well-drained soil

    Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L,  10L ( subject to availability)

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    Mahonia varieties such as ‘Charity’ and ‘Winter Sun’

    ?Flowers:  November – March (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 5m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moist-well-drained, fertile, humus-rich soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L, 20L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Nandina varieties such as ‘domestica’ and ‘Fire Power’ 

    Nandinas provide autumn interest when leaves turn shades of fiery red and copper.

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ?Flowers:  July  (depending on variety)

    ? Height: Up to 2m (depending on the variety)

    ? Width: Up to 1.5m (depending on the variety)

    Soil:  moist, well-drained soil

    ———————————————————————————————

    Pyracantha varieties such as ‘Red Column’ and ‘Golden Sun’ 

    An upright evergreen shrub with dark leaves and spiny branches. Vibrant yellow, red, and orange berries can be seen in autumn when little else is providing interest.

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ?Flowers: May

    ? Height: Up to 3m (depending on the variety)

    ? Width: Up to 3m (depending on the variety)

    Soil:  fertile, well-drained soil

    Pot size: 2L, 3LD, 5L,  10L, 20L + ( subject to availability and the variety)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Sarcococca confusa

    ? Position: Partial – deep shade

    ?Flowers: December – March

    ? Height: Up to 2m (depending on the variety)

    ? Width: Up to 1m (depending on the variety)

    Soil:  fertile, humus-rich, moist, well-drained soil

    Pot size: 2L, 3LD, 5L,  10L  ( subject to availability and the variety)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Sedum varieties such as ‘Touchdown Teak, ‘Autumn Joy’ ‘Herbstfreude’ & ‘Frosted Fire’

    ?Flowers:  August – November (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 0.6m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moderately fertile, well-drained, neutral to slightly alkaline soil

     Pot size: 2l, 3L, 5L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Skimmia varieties such as ‘Rubella’ and ‘Kew Green’

    ?Flowers:  April – May (depending on variety) flower buds are seen in autumn-winter.

    ? Position: Partial – full shade

    ? Height: Up to 1.5m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moist-well-drained, acid soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Viburnum varieties such as ‘tinus’ and ‘bod Dawn’

    ?Flowers:  December – April

    ? Position: Full sun or partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 3m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, moist-well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

     

    Posted 1st Nov 11:17am
    Read more >

  26. The Growers Plantspo - September Herbaceous

    The Growers Plantspo - September Herbaceous

    Are you in need of some inspiration for your next garden project and after some late-flowering herbaceous plants that will go into early Autumn? check out some of our favourite September flowering varieties from Sedum to Anemone.

    Achillea varieties such as ‘Terracotta’, ‘Cloth of Gold’ and ‘Moon Dust

    Achilleas are a great addition to a mixed border or cottage garden in full sun – partial shade with flat-topped flowers that bloom from June – September with many cultivars and colours to choose from ranging from yellow to white and pink.

    ?Flowers:  June-September (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade (depending on variety)

    ? Height: Up to 1m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moist, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Anemone varieties such as ‘September Charm’, ‘Honorine Jobert’ & ‘Hadspen Abundance’

    ?Flowers:  August – October (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 1.2m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moist, fertile, humus-rich soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Alchemilla Mollis

    ?Flowers:  June-September (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 0.6m

    Soil: Humus-rich soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L

    ———————————————————————————————

    Alstromeria varieties such as ‘White Magic’, ‘Indian Summer’ and ‘Inticancha Maya’

    ?Flowers:  June-September (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 0.9m (depending on the variety)

    Soil: Fertile, moist, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 3L

    ——————————————————————————————–

    Agastache varieties such as ‘Morello’, ‘Little Adder’ & ‘Blue Fortune’

    ?Flowers:  July – October (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 1m (depending on the variety)

    Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L. 3L

    ——————————————————————————————–

    Agapanthus varieties such as Africanus, ‘Twister’ and ‘Polar Ice’

    ?Flowers:  July – September (depending on the variety)

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 1m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, moist, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L  (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ——————————————————————————————–

    Aster varieties such as ‘Monch’, ‘Bahamas’ & ‘Barbados’

    ?Flowers: August – October (depends on the variety)

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 0.9m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Well-drained, moderately fertile soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L

    ———————————————————————————————

    Campanula varieties such as ‘Perla Blue’, ‘Perla White’ & ‘White Clips’

    ?Flowers: July – September (depends on the variety)

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 0.3m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moist, well-drained, soil

     Pot size: 2L

    ———————————————————————————————

    Coreopsis varieties such as ‘Limerock Ruby’, ‘Golden Sphere’ and ‘Sunkiss’

    ?Flowers: June – September (depends on the variety)

    ? Position: Full sun -partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 0.5m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 3L

    ———————————————————————————————

    Crocosmia varieties such as ‘Lucifer’ and ‘George Davidson’

    ?Flowers: August – September

    ? Position: Full sun -partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 1.2m (depending on variety)

    Soil:Moderately fertile, humus-rich, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 3L, 5L

    ———————————————————————————————

    Dahlia varieties such as ‘Happy Days Pink’, ‘Happy Days Red’ and ‘Happy Days Yellow’

    ?Flowers: June – September (depends on the variety)

    ? Position: Full sun -partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 0.5m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 3L

    ———————————————————————————————

    Echinacea varieties such as ‘White Swan’, ‘Magnus’ and ‘Alba’

    ?Flowers: July – September

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 1m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Most soils, except very dry or boggy

     Pot size: 2L, 3L

    ———————————————————————————————

    Erigeron varieties such as ‘Sea Breeze’ and Erigeron karvinskianus

    ?Flowers: May – October (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 0.5m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L

     

    ———————————————————————————————

    Geranium varieties such as ‘Rozanne’ and ‘Max Frei’ 

    ?Flowers: June – October (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 0.6m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L

    ———————————————————————————————

     

    Leucanthemum ‘Banana Cream’ and ‘Snow Lady’

    ?Flowers: June – September (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 1m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moderately fertile, moist but well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L

    ———————————————————————————————

    Liatris varieties such as ‘Alba’, ‘Floristan’ & ‘Kobold’

    ?Flowers: August – September (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 1m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moderately-fertile, reliably moist soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L

    ———————————————————————————————

    Nepeta varieties such as ‘Six Hills Giant’, ‘Walkers Low’ and ‘Junior Walker’

    ?Flowers: June – September (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun- partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 0.9m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moist, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2l, 3L, 5L (depending on variety and subject to availability).

    ———————————————————————————————

    Penstemon varieties 

    ?Flowers: July – October

    ? Position: Full sun- partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 1m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, moist, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2l, 3L (depending on variety and subject to availability).

    ———————————————————————————————

    Persicaria varieties such as ‘Darjeeling Red’, ‘Superba’ and ‘Delgado’

    ?Flowers: June – October (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun- partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 1m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Any moist soil

     Pot size: 2l (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Perovskia varieties such as ‘Blue Spire’, ‘Lacey Blue’ & ‘Little Spire’

    ?Flowers: August – September (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 1.2m (depending on variety)

    Soil:Well-drained, poor to moderately fertile

     Pot size: 2l, 5L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Rudbeckia varieties such as ‘Goldsturm’, ‘Maya’ & ‘Sunbeckia Mia’

    ?Flowers: August – October (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 0.8m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moderately fertile, preferably heavy but well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2l, 3L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Salvia varieties such as ‘Caradonna’, ‘Cherry Lips and ‘Sensation White’

    ?Flowers: June – October (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 1.2m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moderately fertile, moist but well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2l, 3L,5L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Sanguisorba varieties such as ‘Tanma’ & ‘Little Angel’

    ?Flowers: June – September (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 0.6m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Poor-to-average, moist, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2l, 3L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Scabiosa varieties such as ‘Butterfly Blue’, ‘Flutter Deep Blue’ and ‘Flutter Deep Pink’

    ?Flowers: June – September (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 0.5m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moderately fertile, well-drained, neutral to slightly alkaline soil

     Pot size: 2l, 3L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Sedum varieties such as ‘Touchdown Teak, ‘Autumn Joy’ ‘Herbstfreude’ & ‘Frosted Fire’

    ?Flowers:  August – November (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 0.6m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moderately fertile, well-drained, neutral to slightly alkaline soil

     Pot size: 2l, 3L, 5L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Verbena varieties such as bonariensis and  ‘Lollipop’

    ?Flowers: July – September

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 2m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moderately fertile, moist but well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Posted 12th Aug 2:20pm
    Read more >

  27. The Growers Plantspo - August Shrubs

    The Growers Plantspo - August Shrubs

    In need of some late-flowering shrubs for your August projects? check out some of our favourites below from Abelia to Vinca.

    Abelia Grandiflora & the variety ‘kaleidoscope’

    ?Flowers: June – October (depending on the variety)

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 1.5m (depending on the variety)

    Soil: Well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L + (subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Buddleia varieties

    ?Flowers: July – September

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 4m

     Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L + (subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Caryopteris varieties such as ‘Pink Perfection’, ‘Gold Crest’ & ‘Heavenly Blue’

    ?Flowers: July – September

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 1m

    Soil: Moderately fertile, moist, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L,  (subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Cotinus varieties such as ‘Royal Purple’

    ?Flowers: July – August

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 5m (depending on variety)

     Soil: Moderately fertile, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L (subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Fuchsia varieties such as ‘Tom Thumb’ ‘Genii’ and ‘Mrs Popple’

    ?Flowers: June-October

    ? Position: Full sun  or partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 1m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, moist well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Haliumium libanotis

    ?Flowers: June-August

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 0.5m

    Soil: Well-drained soil

     Pot size: 3L,10L (subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Hebe varieties such as ‘Little Leaves’, ‘Green Globe’ & ‘Rhubarb and Custard’

    ?Flowers: July-September (depending on the variety)

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 1m (depending on the variety)

    Soil: poor or moderately fertile, moist, well-drained neutral to slightly alkaline soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L (subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Hydrangea varieties such as petiolaris, ‘Annabelle’ & ‘Limelight’

    ?Flowers: June-September (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade (depending on variety)

    ? Height: Up to 1.5m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moist, well-drained soil, fertile soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 7.5L,  10L + (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Hypericum varieties such as ‘miracle bliss’ and Hidcote

    ?Flowers: June-October (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade (depending on variety)

    ? Height: Up to 1m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moderately fertile, moist but well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L,  10L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Lavatera varieties such as ‘Rosea’ and ‘Baby Barnsley’

    ?Flowers: June-September

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 2m

    Soil: Fertile -well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L  (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Lavender varieties such as ‘Hidcote’ and ‘munstead’

    ?Flowers: June-September

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 0.6m

    Soil:  Fertile -well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 7.5L, 10L  (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Potentilla varieties such as ‘Red Robin’ ‘Lovely pink’ ‘Goldfinger’ ‘Abbotswood’ and ‘Tangerine’ 

    ?Flowers: May – October

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 1m depending on the variety

    Soil: moderately fertile, well-drained soil

    Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 7.5L, 10L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Roses (shrub varieties) such as ‘Rosa Kent’

    ?Flowers: July – September

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 1.5m depending on the variety

    Soil: fertile, humus-rich, moist, well-drained soil

    Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 7.5L, 10L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

     

    Spiraea varieties such as ‘Golden Princess’, ‘Goldflames’ and ‘Firelight’ 

    ?Flowers: July – August (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 2m + (depending on variety)

    Soil: moderately fertile, well-drained soil

    Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 7.5L, 10L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Vinca varieties such as ‘major’, minor’ and ‘atropurpurea’ 

    ?Flowers: April – September

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 0.45m depending on the variety

    Soil: any but very dry soil

    Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Posted 1st Aug 10:55am
    Read more >

  28. Plant donations see NHS hospital gardens bloom

    Plant donations see NHS hospital gardens bloom

    We have recently donated plants worth hundreds of pounds to two Yorkshire NHS hospitals.

    The newly created Rainbow Garden at Doncaster Royal Infirmary has benefited from a donation of plants worth £500. The garden, which is situated near the main entrance of the hospital, was designed to create a place where visitors and staff could go to remember the town’s 900 plus Covid-19 victims.

    Colleagues at the hospital had been raising funds since June 2020 for the project, with almost 300 supporters providing donations both large and small.

    The memorial garden features flower beds, a central lawn, paving, a patio and a pergola, all of which our Doncaster-based customer, AWS Landscapes Ltd kindly provided at cost.

    Plants supplied and donated include Lavandula ‘Victory’, Prunus laur. ‘Rotundifolia’, Hydrangea pan. ‘Little Lime’, Cotinus ‘Royal Purple’, Magnolia soulangeana, Achillea ‘Walther Funcke’, Echinacea purpurea, Heuchera ‘Palace Purple’ and Persicaria affinis ‘Superba’.

    A similar garden has been created at the hospital’s sister facility at Bassetlaw.

    Harrogate Hospital and Community Charity have also received plants from Johnsons worth more than £300. The plants were first used at the Harrogate Flower Show earlier this year as part of a gold award-winning display created by Lisa Norton from Harrogate Garden Design.

    The display, entitled Escape Your Mind, featured an array of plants such as Buxus Sempervirens, Euphorbia, Pittosporum Magnolia Acuminata ‘Blue Opal’, Dahlia ‘Orange Sunshine, Phlox ‘Clouds of Perfume’, Cortaderia ‘Pink Feather’ and Salix ‘Golden Sunshine’. These have now been replanted at the hospital for staff and visitors to enjoy, providing an area of rest and reflection.

    Richard Parker OBE, chief executive at Doncaster and Bassetlaw Teaching Hospitals, said: “On behalf of all within Team DBTH, I want to thank Johnsons of Whixley and AWS Landscapes Ltd for their contributions to our Rainbow Gardens. The generosity shown towards our Trust throughout the past 18 months or so has been nothing short of spectacular and I am so pleased that, together, we have been able to create these beautiful memorial spaces for those who are sadly no longer with us. Once again, thank you.”

    Harrogate Hospital’s business development charity and volunteer manager Sammy Lambert commented: “On behalf of the Trust I would like to thank Johnsons and Harrogate Garden Design for their generosity and donation of beautiful plants which have made such a difference to our outside areas.”

    David Sowerby, director of AWS Landscapes Ltd, said: “We are indebted to all the NHS staff who have given so much during the pandemic, and to those who sadly lost their lives. As a mark of our thanks and respect, we made our own donation and carried out all the works to create this garden for all to enjoy. We hope that the garden can be a beautiful space where staff and visitors can rest and reflect away from the stress of their busy working day.”

    We are incredibly pleased to be able to give something back to both hospitals via our donation of plants which has helped two outside areas bloom. We are forever grateful to the NHS staff who have given so much over the past 18 months and that they continue to do so. We hope our plants are enjoyed by staff and visitors for many years to come.

    This is one of many plant donations this year, as we pledged to donate plants to 12 different charities throughout our Centenary these donations have included plants to The Blue Cross, Thirsk, a memorial garden for Sir Captain Tom Moore and Henshaw’s Arts and Crafts.

    Posted 27th Jul 4:37pm
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  29. A touching memorial for Capt Sir Tom Moore

    A touching memorial for Capt Sir Tom Moore

    We recently teamed up with a landscaping firm and our customer Ray Skelton (Harrogate) Ltd to help create a touching memorial for a national hero and campaigner, Capt Sir Tom Moore.

    This year we celebrate our Centenary while the late Capt Sir Tom, who raised millions of pounds for the NHS, celebrated his 100th birthday in April 2020. He passed away in February this year.

    The memorial was unveiled on the 7th July in front of World War II veteran Capt Sir Tom’s family, Junior Soldiers and sponsors such as Ray Skelton (Harrogate) Ltd and Johnsons.

    Chairman John Richardson and his grandaughter and Marketing Manager Eleanor Richardson attended with Director Stuart Skelton of Ray Skelton (Harrogate) Ltd and Colin Simpson.

    Ray Skelton (Harrogate) Ltd commissioned Kris Elvidge, a local Stone Mason, himself a Yorkshireman, to engrave the stones that can be seen on the front and back of the college headquarters identifying the start and finish of the Capt Sir Tom Moore Walk. They also created 4 seating areas that surround a centre stone halfway along the main walkway taken by junior soldiers on parade day.

    Through landscaper Ray Skelton (Harrogate) Ltd, Johnsons donated two Magnolia ‘Double Diamond’ 200-250 110L trees and 50 Hydrangea arborescens ‘Annabelle’ worth a total of £765 to the memorial at Army Foundation College Harrogate, where he was an honorary colonel.

    The trees are among six planted by Junior Soldiers from the Army college in honour of Capt Sir Tom and to launch the Queen’s Green Canopy campaign across the country.

    The Queen’s Green Canopy is a tree planting initiative to mark the Queen’s Platinum Jubilee in 2021. People across the UK are being invited to ‘plant a tree for the jubilee’, with community groups and schools encouraged to take part from October, when the tree planting season begins.

    Capt Sir Tom captured the nation’s hearts when he raised over £32m for NHS Charities by walking 100 laps of his garden during the first lockdown. He was born in Keighley but more recently lived in Marston Moretaine in Bedfordshire.

    He inspired millions when his saying ‘Tomorrow will be a good day’ trended on social media and became the oldest ever recording artist to reach number one when his duet of You’ll Never Walk Alone with Michael Ball topped the charts. On his 100th birthday, he received thousands of cards from well-wishers across the world, including the Queen and Prime Minister, and was honoured with an RAF flypast.

    Eleanor Richardson, Johnsons of Whixley’s marketing manager, said: “We were delighted to be part of this fitting tribute to Capt Sir Tom Moore, who was a true inspiration. The donation is particularly fitting as the magnolia is native to Asia, where he served during World War II.”

    Stuart Skelton, Director of Ray Skelton (Harrogate) Ltd said “It has been an honour and a privilege to be involved in the Capt Sir Tom Moore Memorial, hopefully, this will continue to inspire future generations of Junior Soldiers”

    Posted 15th Jul 11:34am
    Read more >

  30. The Growers Plantspo - September Shrubs

    The Growers Plantspo - September Shrubs

    In need of some late-flowering shrubs for your September projects? check out some of our favourites below from Abelia to Vinca.

    Abelia Grandiflora & the variety ‘kaleidoscope’

    ?Flowers: June – October (depending on the variety)

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 1.5m (depending on the variety)

    Soil: Well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L + (subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Buddleia varieties

    ?Flowers: July – September

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 4m

     Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L + (subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Caryopteris varieties such as ‘Pink Perfection’, ‘Gold Crest’ & ‘Heavenly Blue’

    ?Flowers: July – September

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 1m

    Soil: Moderately fertile, moist, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L,  (subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Fuchsia varieties such as ‘Tom Thumb’ ‘Genii’ and ‘Mrs Popple’

    ?Flowers: June-October

    ? Position: Full sun  or partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 1m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, moist well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Hebe varieties such as ‘Little Leaves’, ‘Green Globe’ & ‘Rhubarb and Custard’

    ?Flowers: July-September (depending on the variety)

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 1m (depending on the variety)

    Soil: poor or moderately fertile, moist, well-drained neutral to slightly alkaline soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L (subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Hydrangea varieties such as petiolaris, ‘Annabelle’ & ‘Limelight’

    ?Flowers: June-September (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade (depending on variety)

    ? Height: Up to 1.5m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moist, well-drained soil, fertile soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 7.5L,  10L + (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Hypericum varieties such as ‘miracle bliss’ and Hidcote

    ?Flowers: June-October (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade (depending on variety)

    ? Height: Up to 1m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moderately fertile, moist but well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L,  10L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Lavatera varieties such as ‘Rosea’ and ‘Baby Barnsley’

    ?Flowers: June-September

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 2m

    Soil: Fertile -well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L  (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Lavender varieties such as ‘Hidcote’ and ‘munstead’

    ?Flowers: June-September

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 0.6m

    Soil:  Fertile -well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 7.5L, 10L  (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Potentilla varieties such as ‘Red Robin’ ‘Lovely pink’ ‘Goldfinger’ ‘Abbotswood’ and ‘Tangerine’ 

    ?Flowers: May – October

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 1m depending on the variety

    Soil: moderately fertile, well-drained soil

    Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 7.5L, 10L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Roses (shrub varieties) such as ‘Rosa Kent’

    ?Flowers: July – September

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 1.5m depending on the variety

    Soil: fertile, humus-rich, moist, well-drained soil

    Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 7.5L, 10L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Vinca varieties such as ‘major’, minor’ and ‘atropurpurea’ 

    ?Flowers: April – September

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 0.45m depending on the variety

    Soil: any but very dry soil

    Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Posted 24th Aug 9:43am
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  31. The Growers Plantspo - October Shrubs

    The Growers Plantspo - October Shrubs

    In need of some autumn interest for your October projects? check out some of our favourites below from Cornus to Rhus.

    Abelia Grandiflora & the variety ‘kaleidoscope’

    ?Flowers: June – October (depending on the variety)

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 1.5m (depending on the variety)

    Soil: Well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L + (subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Fuchsia varieties such as ‘Tom Thumb’ ‘Genii’ and ‘Mrs Popple’

    ?Flowers: June-October

    ? Position: Full sun  or partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 1m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, moist well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Hypericum varieties such as ‘miracle bliss’ and Hidcote

    ?Flowers: June-October (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade (depending on variety)

    ? Height: Up to 1m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moderately fertile, moist but well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L,  10L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

     

    Potentilla varieties such as ‘Red Robin’ ‘Lovely pink’ ‘Goldfinger’ ‘Abbotswood’ and ‘Tangerine’ 

    ?Flowers: May – October

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 1m depending on the variety

    Soil: moderately fertile, well-drained soil

    Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 7.5L, 10L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Euonymus Alatus

    A bushy dense deciduous shrub with green leaves that turn to shades of strawberry red during autumn.

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 2m

    ? Width: Up to 3m

    Soil:  well-drained soil

    Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L,  10L ( subject to availability)

    Euonymus europaeus

    Dark green leaves turn to a spectacular blazing scarlet colour during autumn and its summer flowers are replaced with orange-pink winged fruit which remains long after leaves have fallen.

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to3m

    ? Width: Up to 2.5m

    Soil:  well-drained soil

    Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L,  10L ( subject to availability)

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    Callicarpa Profusion

    Known for its striking violet, bead-like berries that appear in autumn and remain after the plant has lost its leaves.

    ? Position: Sun or dappled shade

    ? Height: Up to3m

    ? Width: Up to 2.5m

    Soil:  well-drained soil

    Pot size: 3L,  10L ( subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

     Cornus varieties such as ‘Midwinter Fire’, and ‘Sibrica’ 

    Cornus are known for their coloured stems that are revealed when their leaves fall. Shades of red, yellow and orange stems are available.

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 3m (depending on the variety)

    ? Width: Up to 2m (depending on the variety)

    Soil:  moderately fertile soil

    Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L,  10L ( subject to availability and the variety)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Pyracantha varieties such as ‘Red Column’ and ‘Golden Sun’ 

    An upright evergreen shrub with dark leaves and spiny branches. Vibrant yellow, red, and orange berries can be seen in autumn when little else is providing interest.

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ?Flowers: May

    ? Height: Up to 3m (depending on the variety)

    ? Width: Up to 3m (depending on the variety)

    Soil:  fertile, well-drained soil

    Pot size: 2L, 3LD, 5L,  10L, 20L + ( subject to availability and the variety)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Cotoneaster  varieties such as’ horizontalis’

    Berries appear on varieties such as ‘horizontalis’ and ‘Coral Beauty’ during the autumn period, in late spring- early summer they are filled with small creamy white flowers.

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ?Flowers:  May-June  (depending on variety)

    ? Height: Up to 2m (depending on the variety)

    ? Width: Up to 1.5m (depending on the variety)

    Soil:  fertile, well-drained soil

    ———————————————————————————————

    Nandina varieties such as ‘domestica’ and ‘Fire Power’ 

    Nandinas provide autumn interest when leaves turn shades of fiery red and copper.

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ?Flowers:  July  (depending on variety)

    ? Height: Up to 2m (depending on the variety)

    ? Width: Up to 1.5m (depending on the variety)

    Soil:  moist, well-drained soil

    ———————————————————————————————

    Viburnum opulus

    Bunches of bright red fruits are visible in autumn and three-lobed, dark green leaves turn to striking shades of red before falling.

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ?Flowers:  May – June  (depending on variety)

    ? Height: Up to 5m (depending on the variety)

    ? Width: Up to 5m (depending on the variety)

    Soil:  Fertile, moist, well-drained soil

    ———————————————————————————————

    Rhus Typhinia 

    An upright deciduous shrub or small tree with dark green leaves that turn to shades of orange-red in autumn before they fall.

    ? Position: Full sun

    ?Flowers:  June – August (depending on variety)

    ? Height: Up to 5m (depending on the variety)

    ? Width: Up to 6m (depending on the variety)

    Soil:  Fertile, well-drained soil

    ———————————————————————————————

    Skimmia Rubella 

    Attractive dark red flower buds are produced in autumn and will be visible on the plant until spring when they burst into flower.

    ? Position: Partial Shade

    ?Flowers:  April – May

    ? Height: Up to 1.5m

    ? Width: Up to 1.5m

    Soil:  Fertile, moist, well-drained acid or ericaceous soil

    ———————————————————————————————

    Cercis ‘Forest Pansy’

    ? Position: Full Sun

    ?Flowers:  March – April

    ? Height: Up to 10m

    ? Width: Up to 10m

    Soil: Moist, well-drained soil

    Posted 15th Sep 10:52am
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  32. July Gardening Reminders 2021

    July Gardening Reminders 2021

    Not sure what to do in the garden this month? check out our July gardening reminders put together by Chairman and Horticulturist John Richardson.

     

    1)   Keep control of soft, fast-growing weeds such as thistles, they harbour aphids and other problems.

     

    2)  Now is the time to make yourself a good big compost bin, just before you really need it!  Ideally, use 4 stakes as corners 1 metre apart in a square and staple wire netting (1 metre deep) around the square.

    This affords easy entry when you wish to empty it, or it can be made bigger or smaller at will.  If you would like a really permanent one, use pressure-treated plywood or boards instead of netting.

     

    3)  Treat shrubs that were cut back in the spring with a high Sulphate of Potash feed to encourage the production of flower buds for next year.

     

    4)Prune shrubs grown on walls and pergolas to remove some of the top growth and further stimulate growth from the base of the plant.

     

    5) Evergreen hedges can be clipped this month (and some deciduous ones), but ensure there are no nesting birds in the hedge or bush. Cut laurel and Eleagnus hedges with secateurs to prevent cut leaves.

    In hot weather, spray newly planted container-grown hedge plant foliage with water as well as ensuring that the root zone continues to be kept moist.

     

    6) Lift tulip bulbs after they have fully died down and store them in paper bags in a dry and airy place over the summer.

     

    7) Keep hydrangeas well-watered, particularly those growing in containers, as they quickly show signs of drought, and it can be difficult to get them to fully recover.

     

    8) Check the moisture level of hanging baskets every morning, and water thoroughly if dry. Feed plants with a soluble or liquid feed once per week and remove flower-heads that are going over.

     

    9) Divide established clumps of bearded iris immediately after blooming and plant in the ground or in containers and keep moist. Discard the older exhausted rhizomes, and cut back the foliage of the new plants to approximately 12-15cm.

     

    10)  Now is the time to sort out your autumn bulb order, to give you maximum choice for next year. Bulb catalogues are now really helpful and a pleasure to look at. Planting early has benefits for almost all bulbs, but leave tulips until late November in order to prevent disease infection.

     

    11) Remove spent rose flower heads and maintain spraying as necessary to combat greenfly, rust, mildew and black spot, as appropriate. Apply a summer rose feed in the middle of the month.

     

    12) Take softwood cuttings of a range of shrubs by selecting healthy young shoots, the cutting s to be 5-8cm long with 2 leaves retained at the top of the cutting. Cut the base cleanly with a knife, just below a node (leaf joint). Dip the base of the cutting in rooting hormone and insert around the edges of a plastic pot in a very gritty compost and cover with clear polythene supported above the foliage. Among many ideal subjects would be Asters, Ceanothus, Cistus, Escallonia, & Hydrangea.

     

    13) Keep a pair of secateurs in your pocket as you wander around the garden, being able to dead-head those flowers which have gone over will ensure a second flush of flowers in many cases.

     

    14) Be sure to keep the bird baths topped up in the hottest of weather!

     

    15) After the natural ‘June drop’ of many fruit trees, thin the remaining fruits to ensure the full development of the best trusses. Where branches are carrying heavy loads of fruit it is well worth considering support for the heaviest, particularly in the case of plums.

     

    16)  When Strawberries have finished fruiting trim back the foliage with shears and remove with any straw mulch which had been applied to protect and support the fruit. This waste can be composted.

     

    In need of more hints and tips for your projects? check out our solution page by clicking here 

    Posted 6th Jul 9:30am
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  33. Johnsons pledge support to York Cares Big Community Challenge 2021

    Johnsons pledge support to York Cares Big Community Challenge 2021

    We have continued our donation of hundreds of plants to Yorkshire charities as part of our centenary celebration.

    We celebrated our 100th birthday this June and are marking our centenary year with a donation of plants to a different charity each month. The latest donation we made was to York Cares Big Community Challenge 2021.

    The York Cares Big Community Challenge 2021  took place between the 9-30th June at Rowntree Park, with 17 volunteering sessions engaging more than 200 volunteers.

    We worked in partnership with the City of York Council Environment and Communities Team and the Friends of Rowntree Park, to prepare the park for its centenary celebration this July.

    York Cares has organised volunteers to clear and weed areas that have been affected by the floods. The volunteers will be replanting and starting the transformation of a part of the park into a new educational wildlife area, thanks to funding from Yorkshire Water.

    Our donation of plants to the value of £200 has been used to revitalise the family picnic garden, which will host families and friends over the summer who go to enjoy the park.

    The initiative is part of the York Cares Big Community Challenge 2021, where local businesses volunteer the services of their employees to transform a community space over the month of June.

    York Cares aims to showcase the positive impact a green environment can have on health, wellbeing, and social inclusion.

    Eleanor Richardson, marketing manager at Johnsons, said: “We are pleased to have donated £200 worth of plants for the Big Community Challenge in June, which will make a transformative difference to Rowntree Park.

    “Many of us have benefited greatly from spaces like this throughout the pandemic so it is a wonderful opportunity to give something back while helping to celebrate both our own and the park’s centenary.”

    Katy Elliott, volunteering support officer at York Cares Big Community Challenge, added: “We are incredibly grateful to Johnson’s of Whixley for their donation of plants which will make a real difference to one of the areas of the park.

    Stu Small, Friends of Rowntree Park Gardener said: “Friends of Rowntree Park are pleased that Johnson’s was able to make a generous donation of plants to support our volunteer gardening programme. Like Johnson’s, Rowntree Park is also celebrating its centenary in 2021. The plants from Johnson’s have helped make an instant impact in our family picnic garden.”

    Posted 6th Jul 10:01am
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  34. The Growers Plantspo - July Shrubs

    The Growers Plantspo - July Shrubs

    In need of some flowering shrubs for your July projects? check out some of our favourite below from Convolvulus to Hebe and Vinca.

    Buddleia varieties

    ?Flowers: July – September

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 4m

    Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L + (subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Convolvulus cneorum 

    ?Flowers: May – July

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 0.6m

     Soil: Poor to moderately fertile, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L (subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Cotinus varieties such as ‘Royal Purple’

    ?Flowers: July – August

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 5m (depending on variety)

     Soil: Moderately fertile, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L (subject to availability)

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    Cistus varieties such as ‘Corbariensis,  ‘Sunset’ and ‘purpureus’. 

    ?Flowers: June-July

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 1m

     Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 7.5L, 10L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Escallonia varieties such as ‘Apple Blossom’, ‘Iveyi’ and ‘Pink Elle‘.

    ?Flowers: June-July and usually again in September

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 1m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L  (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Fuchsia varieties such as ‘Tom Thumb’ ‘Genii’ and ‘Mrs Popple’

    ?Flowers: June-October

    ? Position: Full sun  or partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 1m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, moist well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Haliumium libanotis 

    ?Flowers: June-August

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 0.5m

    Soil: Well-drained soil

     Pot size: 3L,10L (subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Hebe varieties 

    ?Flowers: July-September (depending on the variety)

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 1m (depending on the variety)

    Soil: poor or moderately fertile, moist, well-drained neutral to slightly alkaline soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L (subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Hydrangea varieties 

    ?Flowers: June-September (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade (depending on variety)

    ? Height: Up to 1.5m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moist, well-drained soil, fertile soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 7.5L,  10L + (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Hypericum varieties such as ‘miracle bliss’ and Hidcote

    ?Flowers: June-October (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade (depending on variety)

    ? Height: Up to 1m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moderately fertile, moist but well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L,  10L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Lavatera varieties such as ‘Rosea’ and ‘Baby Barnsley’

    ?Flowers: June-September

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 2m

    Soil: Fertile -well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L  (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Lavender varieties such as ‘Hidcote’ and ‘munstead’.

    ?Flowers: June-September

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 0.6m

    Soil:  Fertile -well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 7.5L, 10L  (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Potentilla varieties such as ‘Red Robin’ ‘Lovely pink’ ‘Goldfinger’ ‘Abbotswood’ and ‘Tangerine’ 

    ?Flowers: May – October

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 1m depending on the variety

    Soil: moderately fertile, well-drained soil

    Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 7.5L, 10L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Roses (shrub varieties)

    ?Flowers: July – September (depending on varieties)

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 1.5m depending on the variety

    Soil: fertile, humus-rich, moist, well-drained soil

    Pot size: 2L, 3L, 4L, 5L, 10L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Spiraea varieties such as ‘Golden Princess’, ‘Goldflames’ and ‘Firelight’ 

    ?Flowers: July – August (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 2m + (depending on variety)

    Soil: moderately fertile, well-drained soil

    Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 7.5L, 10L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Vinca varieties such as ‘major’, minor’ and ‘atropurpurea’ 

    ?Flowers: April – September

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 0.45m depending on the variety

    Soil: any but very dry soil

    Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Interested in July flowering herbaceous for your planting plan also? click here

    Posted 29th Jun 9:25am
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  35. Named as runner-up in the Family Business Awards

    Named as runner-up in the Family Business Awards

    We were pleased to be crowned runner-up for the Yorkshire region at the prestigious Family Business of the Year Awards last week.

    The virtual awards evening, which celebrates the best of British family businesses, was organised by Family Business United and took place on Thursday 24th June.

    The UK’s leading supplier of safety products and services, Arco scooped up the Yorkshire Family Business of The Year title as well as Supreme Family Business of the Year 2021.

    Three generations of the Richardson family work at Johnsons including Chairman John Richardson, Group Managing Director Graham Richardson and Directors Iain and Andrew Richardson. Also on the team are Tracey Richardson and John’s grandchildren Luke, Robert, Eleanor, Paul, Shaun and Jonathan Richardson, who perform a variety of roles from Production Manager to Sales Manager.

    We are incredibly proud to have made it to the finals alongside so many great family businesses and are over the moon to be crowned runner-up in our 100th year.

    Congratulations to all winners, finalists and runners-up.

     

    Posted 28th Jun 3:45pm
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  36. The Growers Plantspo - July Herbaceous

    The Growers Plantspo - July Herbaceous

    Are you in need of some inspiration for your next garden project and after some flowering July herbaceous plants? check out some of our favourite varieties from Alstromeria to Helenium, Penstemon and Veronica.

    Achillea varieties such as ‘Terracotta’, ‘Cloth of Gold’ and ‘Moon Dust

    Achilleas are a great addition to a mixed border or cottage garden in full sun – partial shade with flat-topped flowers that bloom from June – September with many cultivars and colours to choose from ranging from yellow to white and pink.

    ?Flowers:  June-September (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade (depending on variety)

    ? Height: Up to 1m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moist, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Alchemilla Mollis

    ?Flowers:  June-September (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 0.6m

    Soil: Humus-rich soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L

    ———————————————————————————————

    Alstromeria varieties such as ‘White Magic’, ‘Indian Summer’ and ‘Inticancha Maya’

    ?Flowers:  June-September (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 0.9m (depending on the variety)

    Soil: Fertile, moist, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 3L

    ———————————————————————————————

    Astilbe varieties such as ‘Fanal’

    ?Flowers:  May – June, August (depends on the variety)

    ? Position: Full sun -partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 1m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moist, humus, rich soil

     Pot size: 2L, 5L  (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Agapanthus varieties such as africanus, ‘Twister’ and ‘Polar Ice’

    ?Flowers:  July – September (depending on the variety)

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 1m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, moist, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L  (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Astrantia varieties such as ‘Claret’, ‘Hadspen Blood’ and ‘Rosea’

    ?Flowers: June – August (depends on the variety)

    ? Position: Full sun -partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 1m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, moist, preferably humus-rich soil

     Pot size: 3L

    ———————————————————————————————

    Coreopsis varieties such as ‘Limerock Ruby’, ‘Golden Sphere’ and ‘Sunkiss’

    ?Flowers: June – September (depends on the variety)

    ? Position: Full sun -partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 0.5m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 3L

    ———————————————————————————————

    Dahlia varieties such as ‘Happy Days Pink’, ‘Happy Days Red’ and ‘Happy Days Yellow’

    ?Flowers: June – September (depends on the variety)

    ? Position: Full sun -partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 0.5m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 3L

    ———————————————————————————————

    Delphinium varieties such as ‘Galahad’ and ‘Magic Fountain Rose Blue White’

    ?Flowers: June – July

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 2m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L

    ———————————————————————————————

    Digitalis varieties such as ‘Albiflora’ and ‘Excelsior Hybrids’

    ?Flowers: June – July

    ? Position: Partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 2m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Humus, rich soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L

    ———————————————————————————————

    Echinacea varieties such as ‘White Swan’, ‘Magnus’ and ‘Alba’

    ?Flowers: July – September

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 1m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Most soils, except very dry or boggy

     Pot size: 2L, 3L

    ———————————————————————————————

    Erigeron varieties such as ‘Sea Breeze’ and Erigeron karvinskianus

    ?Flowers: May – October (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 0.5m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L

    ———————————————————————————————

    Eryngium varieties such as ‘Neptune’s Gold’

    ?Flowers: July – August

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 0.5m (depending on variety)

    Soil: dry, well-drained, poor to moderately fertile soil

     Pot size: 2L

    ———————————————————————————————

    Geranium varieties such as ‘Rozanne’ and ‘Max Frei’ 

    ?Flowers: June – October (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 0.6m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L

    ———————————————————————————————

    Geum varieties such as ‘Totally Tangerine’, ‘Cosmopolitan’ and ‘Sunrise’

    ?Flowers: June – August (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 0.6m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, moist, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 3L

    ———————————————————————————————

    Helenium varieties such as ‘Moerheim Beauty’, ‘Short and Sassy’ and ‘The Bishop’ 

    ?Flowers: July – August (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 1m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, moist, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L

    ———————————————————————————————

    Leucanthemum ‘Banana Cream’ and ‘Snow Lady’

    ?Flowers: June – September (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 1m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moderately fertile, moist but well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L

    ———————————————————————————————

    Lupinus varieties such as ‘Gladiator’, ‘Persian Slipper’ and ‘Red Rum’

    ?Flowers: June – July

    ? Position: Full sun- partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 1.2m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2l, 3L, 5L (depending on variety and subject to availability).

    ———————————————————————————————

    Monarda varieties such as ‘Balmy Lilac’ and ‘Balmy Pink’

    ?Flowers: July – August

    ? Position: Full sun- partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 0.4m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, moist, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2l, 3L (depending on variety and subject to availability).

    ———————————————————————————————

    Nepeta varieties such as ‘Six Hills Giant’, ‘Walkers Low’ and ‘Junior Walker’

    ?Flowers: June – September (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun- partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 0.9m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moist, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2l, 3L, 5L (depending on variety and subject to availability).

    ———————————————————————————————

    Paeonia varieties such as ‘Felix Crousse’ and ‘Bowl of beauty’ 

    ?Flowers: June – July

    ? Position: Full sun- partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 1m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moist, humus-rich, free-draining soil

     Pot size: 2l, 3LD (depending on variety and subject to availability).

    ———————————————————————————————

    Penstemon varieties 

    ?Flowers: July – October

    ? Position: Full sun- partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 1m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, moist, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2l, 3L (depending on variety and subject to availability).

    ———————————————————————————————

    Persicaria varieties such as ‘Darjeeling Red’, ‘Superba’ and ‘Delgado’

    ?Flowers: June – October (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun- partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 1m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Any moist soil

     Pot size: 2l (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Salvia varieties such as ‘Caradonna’, ‘Cherry Lips and ‘Sensation White’

    ?Flowers: June – October (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 1.2m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moderately fertile, moist but well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2l, 3L,5L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Scabiosa varieties such as ‘Butterfly Blue’, ‘Flutter Deep Blue’ and ‘Flutter Deep Pink’

    ?Flowers: June – September (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 0.5m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moderately fertile, well-drained, neutral to slightly alkaline soil

     Pot size: 2l, 3L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Tiarella varieties such as ‘Spring Symphony’ and ‘Pink Symphony’

    ?Flowers: May – July

    ? Position: Partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 0.4m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Cool, moist, humus-rich soil

     Pot size: 3L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Verbena varieties such as bonariensis and  ‘Lollipop’

    ?Flowers: July – September

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 2m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moderately fertile, moist but well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Veronica varieties such as ‘Anniversary Blue’ 

    ?Flowers: June – August

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 1m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moderately fertile, moist but well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    For more ‘plantspiration’ head to our solutions section of the website here

    Posted 28th Jun 11:32am
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  37. Plants supplied to enhance the grounds of a Cotswold care home

    Plants supplied to enhance the grounds of a Cotswold care home

    We recently teamed up with Deacon Design and AWS Landscapes Ltd to supply thousands of plants and trees to create stunning landscaped gardens at a new care home in the heart of the Cotswolds.

    A colourful array of more than 3,000 plants and shrubs, including magnolia, cherry and apple trees, and evergreen hedges, have been used to transform the grounds of Upton Mill Care Home in Tetbury.

    In addition to the extensive gardens, the care home– part of the Porthaven Care Homes Group – offers residents the use of a cinema, gym, café, hair salon, activities lounge and even a private dining room.

    Working with long-standing client AWS Landscapes Ltd and Landscape Architects,  Deacon Design, we provided various plants and trees for the care home’s spacious grounds.

    AWS Landscapes Ltd carried out the soft landscaping elements of the project which included planting several apple and magnolia trees, along with several Betula jacquemontii (Himalayan beech), Fagus sylvatica ‘Dawyck Gold’ (golden beech) and Pyrus calleryana ‘Chanticleer’ (ornamental pear tree).

    Colourful flowers such as Camellia japonica ‘Elegans’ and Clematis Montana ‘Grandiflora’ 10L along with grasses like Cornus sanguinea ‘Midwinter Fire’ were included in the plant supply, that have enhanced the home’s outdoor communal areas.

    Landscape Architects, Deacon Design, has worked closely with Porthaven Care Homes for many years. Since then, they have established an award-winning landscape design model that embraces Porthaven’s philosophy for the well-being of residents.

    The new care home at Tetbury offers a landscape design with a series of communal garden spaces, including dining terraces, a formal lawn, chessboard and games area that allow residents, families, and staff to relax, socialise and exercise outdoors.  Deacon Design’s approach includes private patio areas accessed directly from resident bedrooms and linked to a garden pathway that meanders through swathes of sensory planting.

    The variety of spaces creates a positive sensory environment for residents and families to enjoy the gardens and benefits of horticultural therapy.

    David Sowerby, Director of AWS Landscapes Ltd, said: “ This was a wonderful scheme to work on, and the design prepared by Deacon Design created a fantastic garden, which will be enjoyed by the residents for many years to come.

    We chose Johnsons of Whixley, who we have used for many years now on our Nationwide contracts to supply the stock for this High profile site as the quality of the stock and the attention to detail given by our contact Andrew Barker is second to none, it is comforting to know that when we place an order with Johnsons everything will be dealt with efficiently and deliveries will always be on time.”

    We have worked on similar projects previously, including a retirement village, Tattenhall, via Ashlea ltd.

    Posted 22nd Jun 8:50am
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  38. A new role for Tom Chilton

    A new role for Tom Chilton

    Congratulations to Tom Chilton, who has taken on the role of Roecliffe Assistant Manager as the previous Assistant Manager, Tony Tillet retired after 32 years.

    Find out what he had to say about his new role below:

    1.What are you most looking forward to in your new role?

    Managing the day to day running of the Roecliffe site and working with the team to produce great plants. It will also be great to see myself “grow” as a manager and further myself as a Horticulturalist.

    2. What was your previous role within the company?

    My main role within Johnsons has been on the production side of the company, I enrolled on the rising stars course soon after joining the company, and I have worked closely with Eric Buckby in the container unit potting shed, which I ended up managing for several weeks in his absence due to the Pandemic.

    3.What do you enjoy most about working at Johnsons?

    I have a general passion for plants. I have been around horticulture my whole life. The Johnsons community is also fantastic I have worked with so many great people here, the Richardson family make you feel very welcome, and I like the happy, upbeat environment in which we work.

    4.What did you do before working at Johnsons? Where did you study?

    Previous to Johnsons I worked for Summerfield Nursery at Poppleton, York. Summerfield grows a fantastic range of plants which they sell to the public and trade customers, I enjoyed my time there.  I had worked there since I was 15. I wouldn’t be where I am now if it wasn’t for them. I studied Horticulture at Askham Bryan College in York.

    5.What do you enjoy doing outside of work?

    I enjoy sport, including road/mountain biking and golf, and I have an allotment in which I grow exhibition vegetables and dahlias.

    6. Tell us a random fact about yourself

    At 21, I’m still a baby; I still can’t swim; no matter how much I try, I can’t do it!

    Posted 17th Jun 8:33am
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  39. Proud to have sold 220 million plants during our century of business

    Proud to have sold 220 million plants during our century of business

    We are proud to have sold around 220 million plants during our century of business.

    Our family business was founded by war veteran Eric Johnson in June 1921 and was bought by John Richardson in 1964; it has been owned by the Richardson family since.

    Notable projects include the Forth Road Bridge, HS1, Royal Parks, The Athletes Village at the Glasgow Commonwealth Games, The National Trust, Studley Royal Gardens, a five-star hotel, Grantley Hall, and the UK’s largest science campus.

    Founder Eric Johnson started the company with minimum assets and a small piece of land bearing a couple of dozen fruit trees. He went on to produce a range of vegetables, fruit and garden plants that he sold directly from the nursery.

    After a year he took on his first employee and bought a model T Ford lorry. He began selling his stock from markets in Knaresborough and Otley markets while selling plants from home at weekends.

    As the business continued to flourish, he took on more employees and began to import plants from Holland.

    But the Second World War was a setback. Eric saw all but one of his staff join the war effort; he stopped growing ornamentals and concentrated instead on producing vegetables. He was given a commission with the Home Guard, with a platoon of 60 covering the area between Walshford Bridge and Skip Bridge along the River Nidd to Nun Monkton, back to Green Hammerton and the A1.

    Towards the end of the war, Eric bought seven acres of land in Whixley and ER Johnson Nurseries, based at Cattal & Whixley, was born. The nursery cropped Brussels sprouts, marrows, roses, ornamental trees and shrubs to name but a few.  The first large order was for 100,000 one-year seedling beech, sold to the Forestry Commission; they were all from one year’s crop and a single tree.

    By 1964, when Yorkshire horticulturist John Richardson and his Scottish wife Dorothy took over, the company was producing 150,000 plants annually, many of which were seedlings of hedge plants and rhododendron ponticum. The business employed 11 full-time staff and had a turnover of £30,500.

    John had spent much of his childhood on his grandparents’ market garden at Carlton, between Leeds and Wakefield. Aged 18, he went to Writtle College in Essex and completed a two-year college diploma in horticulture. Leaving college, John worked a full year for Willy and Robert Bean in East Yorkshire on intensive salad crops, while in his spare time he would grow rhubarb roots on borrowed land. He managed to sell the lot to the Bean brothers for £400 – a small fortune when the weekly wage at the time was just £6.50.

    In September 1958 John moved to Surrey to work on the specialist market garden of FA Secret Limited for three years. He spent six months driving lorry-loads of produce from there to Covent Garden wholesale vegetable market. On his return journey, he would have to hand-load either five tons of spent hops from the Guinness brewery in north London or a consignment of horse manure from the Royal Mews, beneath Buckingham Palace.

    He recalls: “On one occasion I was almost arrested as I drove down The Mall and through Admiralty Arch with a load of manure – lorries of any sort, particularly those full of manure, are not allowed down the Mall in front of the palace!”

    By 1961 John had joined Fisons as the commercial representative for horticulture in Scotland, where he met Dorothy. The couple were married in 1962. John knew his heart lay in practical growing so was intrigued when his uncle, who owned a garage in the North Yorkshire village of Whixley, told him the owner wanted to retire. After a grand total of 16 trips from Scotland, the sale of the business was finalized and John was the proud new owner of Johnsons of Whixley.

    Today, Johnsons has almost 200 acres of land and 120 employees, rising to 150 seasonally. The business sells between five and six million plants and trees each year. Despite the pandemic and Brexit, turnover for 2020 was £13.2m the second highest in the company’s history.

    It remains a true family business, with 11 members of the Richardson family performing a variety of roles within the company. John, now 83, is the company chairman and still works a four-day week. His son Graham is the group managing director and makes the business’s overall decisions, with support from his brothers Iain and Andrew, who are directors.

    John’s grandchildren Luke, Robert, Eleanor, Paul, Shaun and Jonathan Richardson are all involved with the business, as is his daughter-in-law Tracey.

    John said: “I always enjoyed physical work and growing things, so my life has been pretty ideal. There have been problems caused by things outside of our control, like the parks no longer buying directly from 1977, Dutch Elm Disease, COVID-19 and Brexit, but we have been able to survive them all so far. 

    “This has not been just my own doing but is thanks to the support of motivated and trusted colleagues who have run the different elements with such professionalism. It is with great pride that I have seen my sons continue to develop the business year on year, and now I watch my grandchildren take up the reins to the even further successful growth of the company.”

    Posted 14th Jun 2:15pm
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  40. The Growers Plantspo - June Herbaceous

    The Growers Plantspo - June Herbaceous

    Want to add colour to your garden projects this month? check out our guide to herbaceous varieties that are looking good this June from Achillea to Tradescantia.

    Herbaceous varieties looking good this June  

    Achillea varieties such as ‘Terracotta’, ‘Cloth of Gold’ and ‘Moon Dust

    Achilleas are a great addition to a mixed border or cottage garden in full sun – partial shade with flat-topped flowers that bloom from June – September with many cultivars and colours to choose from ranging from yellow to white and pink.

    ?Flowers:  June-September (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade (depending on variety)

    ? Height: Up to 1m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moist, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Alchemilla mollis

    ?Flowers:  June-September (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 0.6m

    Soil: Humus-rich soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L

    ———————————————————————————————

    Allium varieties such as ‘Purple Sensation’ and ‘Mount Everest’

    ?Flowers:  May – June

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 1.2m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L  (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Astilbe varieties such as ‘Fanal’

    ?Flowers:  May – June, August (depends on the variety

    ? Position: Full sun -partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 1m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moist, humus, rich soil

     Pot size: 2L, 5L  (depending on variety and subject to availability)

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    Astrantia varieties such as ‘Claret’, ‘Hadspen Blood’ and ‘Rosea’

    ?Flowers: June – August (depends on the variety)

    ? Position: Full sun -partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 1m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, moist, preferably humus-rich soil

     Pot size: 3L

    ———————————————————————————————

    Coreopsis varieties such as ‘Limerock Ruby’, ‘Golden Sphere’ and ‘Sunkiss’

    ?Flowers: June – September (depends on the variety)

    ? Position: Full sun -partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 0.5m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 3L

    ———————————————————————————————

    Dahlia varieties such as ‘Happy Days Pink’, ‘Happy Days Red’ and ‘Happy Days Yellow’

    ?Flowers: June – September (depends on the variety)

    ? Position: Full sun -partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 0.5m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 3L

    ———————————————————————————————

    Delphinium varieties such as ‘Galahad’ and ‘Magic Fountain Rose Blue White’

    ?Flowers: June – July

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 2m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L

    ———————————————————————————————

    Digitalis varieties such as ‘Albiflora’ and ‘Excelsior Hybrids’

    ?Flowers: June – July

    ? Position: Partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 2m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Humus, rich soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L

    ———————————————————————————————

    Erigeron varieties such as ‘Sea Breeze’ and Erigeron karvinskianus

    ?Flowers: May – October (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 0.5m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, well drained soil

     Pot size: 2L

    ———————————————————————————————

    Geranium varieties such as ‘Rozanne’ and ‘Max Frei’ 

    ?Flowers: June – October (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 0.6m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L

    ———————————————————————————————

    Geum varieties such as ‘Totally Tangerine’, ‘Cosmopolitan’ and ‘Sunrise’

    ?Flowers: June – August (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 0.6m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, moist, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 3L

    ———————————————————————————————

    Iris varieties such as pseudacorus, ‘Perry’s Blue’ and ‘Tamberg’

    ?Flowers: May-June

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 1.2m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Well-drained, moderately fertile, neutral to slightly acidic soil

     Pot size: 2l, 3L (depending on variety and subject to availability).

    ———————————————————————————————

    Lupinus varieties such as ‘Gladiator’, ‘Persian Slipper’ and ‘Red Rum’

    ?Flowers: June – July

    ? Position: Full sun- partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 1.2m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2l, 3L, 5L (depending on variety and subject to availability).

    ———————————————————————————————

    Paeonia varieties such as ‘Felix Crousse’ and ‘Bowl of beauty’ 

    ?Flowers: June – July

    ? Position: Full sun- partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 1m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moist, humus-rich, free-draining soil

     Pot size: 2l, 3LD (depending on variety and subject to availability).

    ———————————————————————————————

    Persicaria varieties such as ‘Darjeeling Red’, ‘Superba’ and ‘Delgado’

    ?Flowers: June – October (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun- partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 1m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Any moist soil

     Pot size: 2l (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Salvia varieties such as ‘Caradonna’, ‘Cherry Lips and ‘Sensation White’

    ?Flowers: June – October (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 1.2m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moderately fertile, moist but well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2l, 3L,5L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Scabiosa varieties such as ‘Butterfly Blue’, ‘Flutter Deep Blue’ and ‘Flutter Deep Pink’

    ?Flowers: June – September (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 0.5m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moderately fertile, well-drained, neutral to slightly alkaline soil

     Pot size: 2l, 3L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Tiarella varieties such as ‘Spring Symphony’ and ‘Pink Symphony’

    ?Flowers: May – July

    ? Position: Partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 0.4m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Cool, moist, humus-rich soil

     Pot size: 3L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Tradescantia ‘Sweet Kate’

    ?Flowers: May – July

    ? Position: Full sun – Partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 0.3m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, moist but well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Please note the above plants listed are subject to availability and is not an exhaustive list of what is available, please contact your sales rep direct for specific requests.

    Click here to view our list of June shrub plants that are looking good

     

    Posted 14th Jun 9:51am
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  41. The Growers Plantspo - June Shrubs

    The Growers Plantspo - June Shrubs

    Not sure what’s looking good in the plant world this month? check out our guide to shrub varieties that are looking good this June from Ceanothus to Spirea plants.

    Shrubs looking good this June

    Ceanothus varieties

    ?Flowers: May – June (depending on variety, varieties such as ‘Puget Blue’ start flowering in April, and others flower for longer than June)

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 3m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

    Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L, 20L + (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Convolvulus cneorum 

    ?Flowers: May – July

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 0.6m

    Soil: Poor to moderately fertile, well-drained soil

    Pot size: 2L, 3L (subject to availability)

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    Cistus varieties such as ‘Corbariensis,  ‘Sunset’ and ‘purpureus’. 

    ?Flowers: June-July

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 1m

     Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

    Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 7.5L, 10L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Deutzia varieties like ‘Mont Rose’ and ‘Rosea’

    ?Flowers: April – June

    ? Position: Full sun – partial

    ? Height: Up to 1m

    Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

    Pot size: 2L, 3L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Escallonia varieties such as ‘Apple Blossom’, ‘Iveyi’ and ‘Pink Elle‘.

    ?Flowers: June-July and usually again in September

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 1m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

    Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L  (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Fuchsia varieties such as ‘Tom Thumb’ ‘Genii’ and ‘Mrs Popple’

    ?Flowers: June-October

    ? Position: Full sun  or partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 1m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, moist well-drained soil

    Pot size: 2L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Haliumium libanotis 

    ?Flowers: June-August

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 0.5m

    Soil: Well-drained soil

    Pot size: 3L,10L (subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Hydrangea varieties 

    ?Flowers: June-September (depending on variety)

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade (depending on variety)

    ? Height: Up to 1.5m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moist, well-drained soil, fertile soil

    Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 7.5L,  10L + (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Lavatera varieties such as ‘Rosea’ and ‘Baby Barnsley’

    ?Flowers: June-September

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 2m

    Soil: Fertile -well-drained soil

    Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L  (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Lavender varieties such as ‘Hidcote’ and ‘munstead’.

    ?Flowers: June-September

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 0.6m

    Soil:  Fertile -well-drained soil

    Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 7.5L, 10L  (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Potentilla varieties such as ‘Red Robin’ ‘Lovely pink’ ‘Goldfinger’ ‘Abbotswood’ and ‘Tangerine’ 

    ?Flowers: May – October

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 1m depending on the variety

    Soil: moderately fertile, well-drained soil

    Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 7.5L, 10L  (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Philadelphus varieties such as ‘Virginal’ ‘Belle Etoile’ and ‘starbright’ 

    ?Flowers: June – July

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 1.5m depending on the variety

    Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

    Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L  (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Spirea ‘snowmound’

    ?Flowers: June – July

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 2.5m

    Soil: Fertile, moist, well-drained soil

    Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L  ( subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Syringa varieties 

    ?Flowers: May-June

    ? Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 4m depending on the variety

    Soil: Fertile, moist, well-drained soil

    Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L, 12L, 20L + (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Viburnum opulus ‘Compactum’

    ?Flowers: June – August

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 1.5m

    Soil: Moist, well-drained soil

    Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L  (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Weigela varieties

    ?Flowers: May-June

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 2.5m depending on the variety

    Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

    Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L  (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Please note the above plants listed are subject to availability and is not an exhaustive list of what is available, please contact your sales rep direct for specific requests.

    Click here to view our list of June herbaceous plants looking good

    Posted 7th Jun 4:42pm
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  42. The Growers Guide - Watering in dry weather

    The Growers Guide - Watering in dry weather

    During warm and drought weather, it can be hard to ensure plants are getting the water they need to survive. Read our guide on watering in dry weather below.

    Drought (the definition for a gardener): drought is considered to occur in a garden when the soil moisture in the plant root zone is exhausted, and the plants wilt—a continuous period of 15 days when there has been no measurable rain.

    •  In hot weather, water in the cool of the early morning, in the evening, the soil and the atmosphere will still be very warm and applied water will quickly evaporate.
    •  Frequent light watering does not penetrate deep into the soil. Soak the soil to a good depth from time to time. This will encourage deeper rooting and the tapping of water at lower levels.
    •  After a heavy watering, apply a mulch around the plant or tree, leaving 4-6 inches around the main stem to prevent fungal attacks. Remember that fine water-absorbing roots are not under the trunk, but towards the edge of the plant canopy.
    •  If water is not available, it has been traditional to hoe the surface soil, but not deeply as you may be cutting surface roots. A crumbly, hoed surface will prevent transpiration from lower depths and facilitate the rapid absorption of rain, or water, which is applied.
    • When watering with a hose, use a rose in the end so that there is no solid water stream, as this would contribute to water run-off and erosion.
    •  There are now many good water sprinklers on the market that have a wide range of spray patterns for efficient watering in a round or rectangular pattern. A sprinkler in conjunction with a water timer in the hose line will make the whole process so much easier.
    •  Seep-hoses are particularly useful as they can be wound amongst plants that are susceptible to drought and left down all year.
    •  Whenever possible, use rainwater (collected in a rainwater butt) for watering lime hating plants, such as rhododendrons, camellias, etc.
    •  It’s worth noting that half an inch of rain equals approx. 13,600 galls/acre or 2.8 gall/sq.
    •  In hot weather, water container pots once a day.
    •  Remember, waterlogging can be as bad as drought!

    Posted 3rd Jun 4:06pm
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  43. The Growers Choice: Fragrant Garden Plants

    The Growers Choice: Fragrant Garden Plants

    Want to add fragrant plants to your garden project? has your client asked to surround the patio or decking area with fragrant plants? or do they want to add scent to their borders? Check out our guide to some of our favourite fragrant garden plants below.

    Lavender varieties

    Lavender plants have been used for thousands of years for their scent in the garden, including their use in essential oils with links to the Romans using it to perfume their baths.  It has also been used for many years, dried out and put in small packets to freshen linen, closets and drawers.

    Ideal for a pathway or patio pot flowering from July through to September, giving you months of fresh fragrance to enjoy.

    ? Flowers: July – September

    ?Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Dependent on variety

    ? Soil: fertile, well-drained soil

    Available in 2L, 3L, 5L and 10L pots (depending on variety)

     

    Trachelospermum jasminoides

    A climbing plant famous for its smell which is often recognised in many perfumes. They prefer full sun and flower from June – August. Its dark green leaves turn to bronze come autumn. Add to a sunny positioned wall or fence near your front or back door.

    ? Flowers: June – August

    ?Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 9m

    ? Soil: fertile, well-drained soil

    Available in 5L, 10L and 20L pots (subject to availability)

    Syringa varieties

    While Syringa’s flowering period is short, its fragrance and bloom size makes up for it. Available in various colours, lilacs generally herald the beginning of warmer weather. Plant in a sunny well-drained spot for best results.

    ? Flowers: May – June

    ?Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 5m (depending on variety)

    ? Soil: fertile, well-drained, neutral to alkaline soil

    Available in 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L, 20L + pots. (subject to availability)

    Sarcococca hookeriana ‘Winter Gem’

    Highly scented white flowers sit above large glossy, rich green leaves come late winter – early spring. It is a great addition to a shady border or a shaded patio spot where you can smell it every day.

    ? Flowers: Late winter-early spring

    ?Position: Partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 0.5m

    ? Soil: fertile, well-drained, moist soil

    Daphne aureomarginata

    Looking for a scented cloud on your walk through the garden? Daphne aureomarginata is another fantastic fragrant plant that flowers from January until April. It is known for its pale pink flowers and thrives best in a sunny sheltered position.

    ? Flowers: December – March

    ?Position: Full sun –  Partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 1.5m

    ? Soil: fertile, well-drained, humus-rich soil

    Rose varieties

    Some rose varieties, such as Rosa de L’hay, are known for their masses of heavily perfumed flowers rich purple in colour. It Would look great at the back of a shrub border and will flower from July to September.

    ? Flowers: July – September (depending on variety)

    ?Position: Full sun –  Partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 2.5m (depending on variety)

    ? Soil: fertile, well-drained, moist humus-rich soil

    Head to our solutions page for more hints and tips here 

    Posted 3rd Jun 11:14am
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  44. The Growers Choice: Late summer blooms

    The Growers Choice: Late summer blooms

    Spring and early summer aren’t the only months where plants are in bloom choose from this selection of ‘late summer blooms’ for plants that go into late summer and beyond.

    Crocosmia varieties

    Choose Crocosmia varieties such as ‘Lucifer’  or ‘George Davidsion’ with funnel shaped flowers as bright as a red tomato, or as yellow as a lemon in ‘George Davidson’s case these plants flower from August to September. Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ will work best in a sunny herbaceous border alongside other bold colours, like Achillea and will reach up to 1m tall.

    ? Flowers: August- September

    ?Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 1m tall (depending on variety)

    ? Soil: Well drained, Hummus-rich soil

    Available in 2L, 3L and 5L pots (depending on variety and availability)

    Hydrangea paniculata varieties

    Fantastic specimen plants ideal for a patio pot or mixed border in full sun – partial shade with some paniculata varieties flowering until October.

    ? Flowers: July – October (depending on variety)

    ?Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 1m tall (depending on variety)

    ? Soil: Moist, well drained, Hummus-rich soil

    Available in 3L, 5L, 7.5L and 10L pots (depending on variety and availability)

    Sedum spectabile

    A great addition to the front of a sunny border and a great source of late nectar for pollinators flowering from August to October with pink flowers on top of grey-green succulent leaves.

    ? Flowers: August – October (depending on variety)

    ?Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 0.45m (depending on variety)

    ? Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

    Available in 2l and 3L pots (depending on variety) 

    Echinacea varieties

    Echinaceas are a firm favourite of butterflies with its fantastic daisy Iike, bright flowers and orange centres. Flowering from July to– September, it’s a must have for your late flowering border.

    ? Flowers: July – September (depending on variety)

    ?Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 1m (depending on variety)

    ? Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

    Available in 2l and 3L pots (depending on variety) 

     

    Rudbeckia varieties

    Rudbeckia varieties such as ‘Goldsturm’ are a great addition to a late sunny summer border and will look great planted amongst ornamental grasses.

    ? Flowers: August – October (depending on variety)

    ?Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 075m (depending on variety)

    ? Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

    Available in 2l  pots (depending on variety) 

     

    Agapanthus varieties

    Globes of trumpet-shaped blue flowers on straight green stems that will last until September. They look fantastic in a pot or summer border.

    ? Flowers: July – September (depending on variety)

    ?Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 0.6m (depending on variety)

    ? Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

    Available in 2l  pots (depending on variety) 

    Verbena bonariensis

    Tall branching stems with clusters of lilac-purple flowers from June to September ideal for the front or middle of a border in full sun.

    ? Flowers: June – September (depending on variety)

    ?Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Up to 2m  (depending on variety)

    ? Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

    Available in 2l  pots (depending on variety) 

     

    Posted 2nd Jun 3:29pm
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  45. What to do in the garden this June

    What to do in the garden this June

    With warmer temperatures and extra sunlight this month, there’s plenty to be doing in the garden, from mowing the lawn to trimming topiary and filling in your borders with herbaceous or bedding plants.

    Check out our June gardening tips below, put together by Chairman and horticulturist John Richardson.

    1)Continue mowing established lawns frequently. Raise the blades a little in parched weather. Treat with weed killer if necessary. Remember to water new lawns in parched weather. Consider laying paving as stepping-stones in areas of high wear.

    2)  Dead-head roses and other plants with a succession of flowers to ensure large blooms and a constant display through the summer. Cut rose stems back to an actively growing bud. Seversuckers from the rootstock by tearing them off, or if too large, cut with a very sharp knife as close to the stem as possible.

    3) Complete the planting of hardy annuals, ensure they are well watered in and kept watered for the first month.  Ensure that slugs and snails do not cause too much damage by removing them by hand or treating them with appropriate slug and snail killer.

    4)   Lightly clip box edging and topiary to remove wandering shoots. Remember to provide feed and water, particularly if they are growing in containers. Trim back the flowering growth of Erica carnea varieties and top dress with peat.

    5)  Check the borders for unexpected gaps and fill them with bedding plants or herbaceous plants, remembering to water them in the coming weeks!

    6)  Plant out young dahlias now the potential for frost is past. Keep well-watered and control greenfly. Apply a mulch to conserve moisture and reduce weeds.

    7)  Water containers whenever the surface feels dry to the touch. Add a liquid feed to the water unless you have incorporated a long-release fertilizer earlier in the season.

    8)  Bright red lily beetles are already on the rampage again. Look for them on the upper surface of lily and Fritillaria leaves, where they take notches out of the leaves. They appear to move back down to soil level in the evening but need catching in daylight. They don’t fly, but any disturbance sends them falling back to ground level, where they remain with their black underside upwards.  Eggs are laid on the underside of the leaves, and larvae live within a mound of their own frass.

    9)  Remove self-sown seedlings of ash and sycamore before they become too established.

    10)  Take softwood or semi-ripe cuttings of cotoneasters, deutzias, fuchsias and philadelphus—root in a glasshouse or cold frame.

    11)  Reduce the number of floating plant leaves in the pond to allow light into the lower regions.

    12)  Tie in the soft young growth of raspberries, be careful not to break them off!.

    13)  Pinch out the growing tips of annual plants to encourage bushiness.

    14)  Sow winter pansies, primulas, violas and Brompton stocks under glass. Foxgloves and wallflowers can be sown outside in a weed-free area of the border to flower next year.

    15)  Earth-up main-crop potatoes and lift early potatoes when they have reached the size of a hen’s egg.

    16)  When watering greenhouse plants, spray a mist over benches, paths, and windows, and open doors and windows on hot days to help reduce the incidence of red spider.

    17)  Keep tying in the long shoots of climbing plants. Tie stronger stems to trellis or posts.

    Posted 1st Jun 1:44pm
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  46. Centenary plant donations help Yorkshire charities bloom

    Centenary plant donations help Yorkshire charities bloom

    We have donated hundreds of plants to Yorkshire charities as part of our centenary celebration.

    We celebrate our  100th birthday in June and are marking our centenary year with a donation of plants to a different charity each month.

    So far, we have gifted hundreds of plants worth more than £600 to Henshaw’s in  Knaresborough, Hope Pastures, Leeds, York Teaching Hospital Charity and, most recently, the Blue Cross at Thirsk.

    Plant varieties recently donated include a wide range of shrubs and herbaceous from Lavandula Hidcote to ‘Achillea’ new white 3L, and Digitalis dalmation rose 2L, Nandina Obsessed 5L, Paeonia  ‘white wings’ 2L, Phlox Emerald cushion blue 2L, Scabiosa ‘Butterfly Blue’ 2L and Vinca minor 2L.

    Blue Cross Animal Welfare Assistant, Lyn Henderson said: “The team at Thirsk Blue Cross would like to thank Johnson’s of Whixley for their generous donation of plants for our site. It’s lovely that everyone who visits our centre will benefit from them and they are already creating a welcoming environment.”

    Hope Pastures Sanctuary Manager, Leonnie Martin said: “We were absolutely thrilled to be chosen as the winning charity from Johnson’s of Whixley and the prize selection of plants was amazing.  We have already installed some in our secret garden and we are using the others to create a peaceful piece of garden at the top of our site as a celebration of the people who leave us a legacy to help us do our work.”

    The last year has been a challenge for many charities; people haven’t had the funds to donate like they usually would. It’s great to give something back to local charities and help their outdoor spaces bloom.

    Posted 1st Jun 9:32am
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  47. Johnsons receive Plant Healthy certification

    Johnsons receive Plant Healthy certification

    We are delighted to announce that we are now Plant Healthy certified.

    The Plant Healthy certification scheme makes it easier to identify businesses that trade and grow plants to a high plant health and biosecurity standard. It reduces the risk of introducing/spreading destructive plant pests and protecting the horticultural industry, other cultivated plants and natural habitats.

    Plant Health is important to Johnsons and many other nurseries for many reasons, such as protecting our woodlands from pests and diseases such as ash-dieback and oak Processionary Moth, to safeguard native flora and fauna from non-native pests and diseases.

    Healthy plants are also fundamental for the creation of beautiful gardens and landscapes and are essential for life, making the oxygen we breathe and absorbing carbon dioxide. They are also essential for the food we eat and without them, we wouldn’t be here.

    Head of Production and Procurement, Jonathan Whittemore, said: “We are acutely aware of our plant Health responsibility which is why our staff are appropriately trained, and our plant health systems are robust. Our recent Plant Healthy certification, shows we are a business that trades and grows plants to a high plant health and biosecurity standard—reducing the risk of introducing or spreading destructive plant pests and protecting the horticultural industry, other cultivated plants, and natural habitats.”

    Click here to view our Plant Healthy certificate.

    Posted 20th May 2:30pm
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  48. The Growers Choice: Cottage garden plants

    The Growers Choice: Cottage garden plants

    Cottage style gardens are generally designed to include informal planting where the plants fill the air with beautiful scents; arches are filled with climbing roses, and borders full to the brim with a wide array of perennials and flowering shrubs.

    Want to include cottage garden plants in your next garden design project? here are some of our favourites

    1.Digitalis commonly known as foxgloves have been a cottage garden favourite for years with bell-shaped flowers available in an array of colours from pink to cream they are happy in a partial shade garden and are a favourite source of pollen for bees.

    ? Flowers: June-July

    ?Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 1m

    ? Soil: moist, humus-rich soil

    Available in 2L pots.

    2. No cottage garden is complete without a Lupin, a popular choice for a traditional cottage garden with tapering spires available in shades of pink, purple, yellow, red and even mixed adding height to the back of a cottage garden border.

    ? Flowers: June-July

    ?Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 1.2m

    ? Soil: fertile, well-drained, sandy soil

    Available in 2L pots.

    3.Roses are a great addition to a cottage garden, and in particular, climbing roses would look fantastic against a trellis, pergola or the walls of a house with some varieties adding fragrance to your garden.

    ? Flowers: July – September

    ?Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Dependent on variety

    ? Soil: fertile, well-drained, moist soil

    Available in 2L pots.

    4. Lavender will add fragrance and colour to your cottage garden and will draw in the pollinators. A great addition to a path, or border. Place in a sunny, well-drained position for best results.

    ? Flowers: July – September

    ?Position: Full sun

    ? Height: Dependent on variety

    ? Soil: fertile, well-drained soil

    Available in 2L, 3L, 5L and 10L pots (depending on variety)

    5. Geranium – A perfect plant doing well in partial shade to full sun, it’s great for underplanting or filling in any empty gaps in your border, adding beautiful purple flowers from June through to October.

    ? Flowers: June – October

    ?Position: Sun – Partial Shade

    ? Height: Up to 0.6m

    ? Soil: fertile, well-drained soil.

    6.Hydrangeas are another firm favourite with varieties producing large clusters of purple, pink, blue or white flowers in early summer.

    ? Flowers: July – August

    ?Position: Sun – Partial Shade

    ? Height: Depends on the variety

    ? Soil: moist, well-drained, fertile soil

    Other popular cottage garden plants include Alchemilla Mollis, Paeonia, Geranium, Phlox, Iris, Hollyhock, Dianthus, Delphinium and Heucheras. For more of our solutions click here

    Posted 18th May 11:36am
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  49. What to do in the garden during May

    What to do in the garden during May

    Summer is on its way as temperatures increase and days get longer, herbaceous plants start to emerge, and the grass is getting longer, there’s plenty to be doing in the garden this month, check out our latest hints and tips for May put together by chairman and horticulturist, John Richardson.

    1)Thoroughly water newly planted trees and shrubs, a really good occasional soak is better than frequent small doses of water. A generally balanced feed in mid-May will help new plantings. A subsequent mulch of crushed bark or compost will help to retain moisture.

    2)Tie in new growth of clematis, roses, climbing hydrangeas, honeysuckle and other fast-growing climbers.

    3)Complete the planting of bare-root and root-balled hedging this month, and ensure that previously planted hedges have not been displaced by wind. Water in again if conditions remain dry.

    4)Give a final clip to established privet, Ivy and Lonicera nitida varieties, and give topiary a quick trim if it is beginning to appear unkempt. Check for nest-building birds before clipping.

    5)Slugs will be on the attack this month, control by picking off by hand or using a biological control such as ‘Nemaslug’ or chemicals based on ferric phosphate.

    6)Plant up hanging baskets this month, but don’t place outside until the prospect of frost is over. Add a water-retaining gel and long release fertilizer for a good show!

    7)Trim lawn edges frequently when dry to develop a firm edge to the lawn, which will not sink when walked upon.

    8)If you did not apply a weed killer to the lawn this spring, use the grass mowings to mulch trees and hedge plants.

    9)Pick off the flower-heads of Rhododendrons and Azaleas as they die back. The flower head will break off easily if bent over just below the old flower head. This encourages the new growth to develop and will be helped with a much of leaf-mould.

    10)Plants should be staked before they become too big and start to flop. Methods to use include pea sticks, bending the tops across to form a canopy or use upright canes around each clump with twine tied around the canes, or wire netting supported by canes in a cylinder around tall plants or extra tall plants tied to canes of the ultimate plant size.

    11)When the danger of overnight frost has passed, purchase your bedding plant requirements. It is a good idea to check when the local parks plant out their summer bedding as a guide

    12)As the weather warms up, ensure that glass areas are shaded and open during the day. To maintain humidity, damp down the paths and other surfaces with a hosepipe.

    13)Dahlias may begin to sprout in mild conditions under glass, don’t plant out until the possibility of frost is past. Consider taking cuttings of the first shoots.

    Posted 30th Apr 3:02pm
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  50. Crowned as the region's 20th top business in our centenary year

    Crowned as the region's 20th top business in our centenary year

    We are delighted to have been crowned as the regions 20th top business in our centenary year.

    We have appeared in the York Top 100 Businesses report for four consecutive editions – but this year have moved into the top 20 for the first time. We are now at number 20, up from 47 in the 2019 list.

    The list is compiled jointly by York Business School at the city’s St John University, Make it York and The Press newspaper.

    Placings are calculated using an algorithm devised by York Business School that includes critical performance factors such as turnover, profit, growth and staff numbers.

    Johnsons was founded in 1921 by World War I veteran Eric Johnson. The firm’s current chairman, John Richardson, took over the business in 1964. It is still run by three generations of the Richardson family, with 120-160 members of staff seasonally and a turnover of over £13 million.

    The company supplies up to six million plants each year to major landscaping schemes across the UK and Northern Ireland with notable projects including The National Trust, Studley Royal Gardens, the Forth Road Bridge, luxury hotel Grantley Hall, royal parks and even the Glasgow Commonwealth Games.

    Chairman, John Richardson commented: “This is an excellent achievement for our 100th year; we are extremely proud to have been crowned as York’s 20th leading business, alongside so many elite businesses in the region. Congratulations to everyone.”

    Click here to view the full York top 100 publication

    Posted 30th Apr 1:55pm
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  51. A new role for Isaac Onions

    A new role for Isaac Onions

    Congratulations to Isaac Onions, who has now taken on the role of Plant Centre Sales Assistant.

    Isaac joined Johnsons in May 2020 as an agency worker and was soon taken on full time as an outside cash & carry worker; before fulfilling this new role recently, below we asked him some questions:

    1)What does your new role include? My new role will include processing customer orders, quoting and general front of house tasks such as answering the phone and scanning trollies.

    2) What was your first job at Johnsons, and what did it involve? On my first day, I was outside weeding on the nursery. It was a sunny day so it was pretty fun.

    3)What are you most looking forward to In your new role? I’m looking forward to a completely new challenge and it’s another step forward in the company.

    4)What do you think the challenges will be? Learning the processes and trying to remember the plant names.

    5)What have you enjoyed about your time at Johnson’s? I love the people that work here, everyone’s really friendly and there’s a nice atmosphere. In Cash and Carry we get sandwiches at the end of every month which gives us something to look forward to.

    6)What do you like to get up to outside of work? I’m quite adventurous, I like going out hiking in the Moors, I even walked from Osmotherley to Saltburn a couple of years ago.  I love running and I do MMA.

    7)Favourite food? Chicken and jalapeños pizza

    8)Favourite holiday destination? I like going back to Malawi to visit my family.

    Cash & Carry Manager Alice Knowles said:  “Isaac has been a great addition to our team since joining us and we are very much looking forward to him progressing his role in sales. He joins us at a busy time however he has already demonstrated great customer service to our customers who visit the c+c and when Hannah leaves will be competent in all aspects of sales.”

    Posted 20th Apr 3:59pm
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  52. Tockwith CE Primary Academy connects with African classroom to 'grow together.'

    Tockwith CE Primary Academy connects with African classroom to 'grow together.'

    We have helped a local Primary Academy connect with classmates in Africa as part of a British Council initiative.

    The scheme, Connecting Classrooms, will see the Umar Bin Alkhatab Primary School in Sierra Leone work on a project on growth with Tockwith Church of England Primary Academy, North Yorkshire.

    We donated more than 200 pots and sunflower seeds for the children at Tockwith to grow. Meanwhile, children at Umar Bin Alkhtab Primary will be growing trees as part of a national scheme in Sierre Leone, that aims to plant 3.8 million trees by June 2024.

    The initiative aims to connect classrooms through global learning, equipping children with knowledge and skills whilst tackling issues such as climate change and gender equality.

    The Yorkshire Primary Academy’s project has a dual purpose as it will symbolise the end of lockdown three and the growth the children will experience by being back amongst friends and staff.

    As well as the donation of sunflower seeds and pots we have donated a Prunus Tai-Haku tree in support of BBC Countryfile’s Plant Britain campaign.

    Headmaster at Tockwith Church of England Primary Academy,  Justin Reeves, said: “We are grateful to Johnson’s of Whixley for their generous donation and for supporting us with our project. After this last year, it will be delightful to see our sunflowers shoot up, symbolising our growth coming out of lockdown. It is also fantastic to link this reciprocal project with our friends in Sierra Leone. ”

    We will also be donating £1,800 worth of plants to local charities during 2021 as part of the business’s centenary celebration.

    Posted 19th Apr 4:39pm
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  53. Finalists in the Family Business of the Year Awards 2021

    Finalists in the Family Business of the Year Awards 2021

    We are delighted to announce that we are finalists in the Family Business of the Year Awards 2021.

    Our family business will have the chance to scoop the Yorkshire regional and supreme champion titles for 2021.

    We are incredibly proud of our identity as a family business and, in many ways, heritage and associated values which define what the company is today and how we operate.

    Those values include absolute team spirit and a ‘workaholic’ attitude. The current managing directors all adopt a hands-on style and are just as likely to be found driving a truck, sweeping up or selecting plants as they are being seated at the board room table.

    Three generations family business members who work at Johnsons include Chairman John Richardson, Group Managing Director Graham Richardson and Directors Iain and Andrew Richardson. Also on the team are Tracey Richardson and John’s grandchildren Luke, Robert, Eleanor, Paul, Shaun and Jonathan Richardson, who perform a variety of roles from Production Manager to Sales Manager.

    Family members are only a small proportion of the business, with 120-150 employees, many of whom have been with the company for 25 years + and have become extended family members.

    Staff appreciation is ‘a mantra’ and we continually invest in small but regular rewards in the shape of ‘Extra Mile Awards’, seasonal vouchers, themed food events and on tap ice lollies throughout the summer. These are ongoing targeted ‘thank-you’s that compliment an annual financial bonus in the form of profit share and an attendance bonus. We believe that this is a successful strategy that is evidenced by our staff’s general satisfaction and a rolling 12-month pandemic absence level of only 1.3%!

    Staff will also be given an additional day’s holiday this year in recognition of their hard work and dedicationn during their career.

    Group Managing Director Graham Richardson said: “Winning this award would be a huge achievement, and what better year than on our 100th.

    We look forward to attending The Family Business awards virtual ceremony, which will take place on June 24th. We would like to thank the judges and wish all finalists the best of luck. ”

    You can find out about the history of our company here

    Posted 15th Apr 9:22am
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  54. Cash & Carry notice: Shopping guidelines, help us, help you

    Cash & Carry notice: Shopping guidelines, help us, help you

    This season has thrown up challenges like no other and increased demand is outstripping availability. Your understanding and patience are greatly appreciated but we ask that you help us, help you and observe the following shopping guidelines. With your help, we can provide a first-class service that meets our varied trade affiliates demands.

    The first two quarters have seen Cash & Carry experience unprecedented demand and sales. We are currently tracking for a third straight record year with a 26% increase in sales (YTD) on last year, a 19% increase in customers and a 20% increase in transactions. We have grown significantly in the space of three years and are working from an ageing site, that has limited capacity and was never intended for its current use. In the near future, we hope to move to a new site but for now, we are constrained to the limitations of our current location.

    Unfortunately due to the closure of nurseries in the first lockdown availability is much reduced and plant source is becoming very difficult. Demand is outstripping availability and we anticipate issues for a number of years ahead until production and site work has caught up. Brexit poses it’s own challenges and lead times have increased significantly due to regulations and checks.

    We are currently navigating the above challenges and your support, understanding and patience is greatly appreciated. We ask that you help us, help you and observe the below guidelines to better improve your service.

    Shopping guidelines 

    £0-£250 spend

    For any customer whose order is below £250 we ask that you lift the plants yourself off the beds here and take away with you on the day. We can on occasion hold your order if you need to call back with a van. We will hold for no longer than four days.

    £250-£500 spend 

    For customers who are spending between £250 and £500, we can quote for these orders and lift the plants. However, it would be appreciated if you can still lift some of the plants off cash and carry especially if you have seen the plants already and know you want particular specimens. These orders would not qualify for delivery; collection only, which can if needed, be held in our customer bays for a limited time.

    £500 + spend

    Any order which has a value of over £500 can be delivered; by either our own transport  (charges may apply). We will quote for these orders, lift and pack them for despatch. You can still lift the plants off the beds and take them away in your own vehicle if you wish.

     

    Posted 13th Apr 3:52pm
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  55. Plant supply helps restore historic Studley Royal to its former glory

    Plant supply helps restore historic Studley Royal to its former glory

    We have supplied thousands of plants to help restore the grounds of the historic Studley Royal water garden to their former glory.

    The estate is just 18 miles from Johnsons’ HQ in North Yorkshire and is one of Europe’s finest examples of an 18th-century garden. 

    The planting is part of the National Trust’s long-term vision for the garden. The scheme involves planting thousands of Taxus baccata (yew), supplied by Johnsons, to replace overgrown and dying hedges. The work includes restoring all bosquets – formal plantations of trees and shrubs with growing space inside, designed to give the effect of an enclosed room.

    Where possible, the aim is to help restore the garden with the bosquets providing an essential part of the structure recreating the experience visitors would have had on their visit during the 18th century.

    Following his father’s death in 1741 William Aislabie became a tour de force creating gardens at Hackfall near Grewelthorpe and at Kirby Fleetham returning back to Studley periodically to enhance and extend his father’s garden. This work was to move into realms others could only dream of when William purchased the lands belonging to Fountains Abbey. By 1770 Studley Royal now including the ruins of the abbey became a ‘breathtaking’ experience. It was said after visiting that you had been ‘kissed’ by a genius.

    Work to restore Aislabies’ yew bosquets has been ongoing since 1983; the hedges are part of one of England’s most spectacular water garden ever to have been built & survived with influences coming from earlier French, Dutch, Italianate gardens.

    But before all of this situated in a secluded valley, Fountains Abbey was established by a breakaway group of Benedictine monks from St Mary’s Abbey in York in 1131. The abbey operated for 400 years and was prosperous, owning vast acres of land across Yorkshire, with sheep farming being a significant income source.

    Michael Ridsdale, Head Gardener at Fountains Abbey and Studley Royal, said: “Working with our local industries is key to the continuing success of the Yorkshire economy. Johnson’s and their former partners have been involved with this great estate for well over 50 years; locally produced stock is extremely important to us, even more so now as climate change is becoming a major issue for us all.

    ‘Keeping it local’ allows us to keep in constant contact with Johnsons; nothing can better for the buyer than being able to jump in the van and see how their stock is growing. We have a lovely relationship with all the staff at Johnson’s and it must be gratifying for them to be able to walk round the estate with their families and say we were part of that. “

    Johnsons’ marketing manager, Eleanor Richardson, added: “We feel privileged to be a part of more than 300 years of history. Since we were children, me & other members of our family have visited Fountains Abbey hundreds of times. The abbey’s past is genuinely fascinating and were excited to watch the hedging grow and flourish, returning the grounds to their former 18th-century glory.”

    Find out more about the National Trust’s conservation work and donate via this link below www.nationaltrust.org.uk/fountainsabbey

    Interested in other projects we have supplied? click here to view our case study section

    Posted 12th Apr 2:52pm
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  56. The Growers Choice: Intruder proof hedging

    The Growers Choice: Intruder proof hedging

    Do you require hedging that will act as a deterrent? these hedging varieties offer a fantastic deterring method that will help keep human and animal intruders away. A great alternative to a wall or fence.

    Prunus spinosa

    A prickly native hedging plant covered in thorns, great as a mixed native hedge with bright white flowers in Spring followed by green foliage and sloes which appear in Autumn. (Great for making Sloe Gin if you get to the sloes before the birds)

    Available as a bare root transplant at 40-60cm tall up to 200cm tall and in container pots after the bare root season.

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 3.5m

    ? Soil: any soil (except water-logged sites)

     

    Crataegus monogyna

    A popular native hedging plant is known for its large thorns which can be seen after its green leaves fall in Autumn. It is also known for its white scented flowers which can be seen in Spring.

    Available in bare-root sizes from 40-60cm up to 200cm tall and in container pots after the bare root season.

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 10 metres

    ? Soil: any soil (except water-logged sites)

     

    Berberis varieties 

    Make a great intruder proof hedge due to its prickly foliage and are available in various colours and sizes as evergreens and deciduous varieties.

    They are available In 2L and 10L pots.

     

    Ilex aquifolium 

    A variety that is known for its spikey dark, glossy, green leaves which make it a great intruder proof hedging variety.  Commonly known as Holly, this plant has an abundance of red berries during autumn and winter attracting birds to feast.

    Available from a p9 pot up to a 20L.

    ? Position: Full sun – Full shade

    ? Height: Up to 12 metres +

    ? Soil: normal, clay or chalk soils

     

    Rosa canina 

    A prickly native variety that is fast growing with pale pink flowers in Summer. Bright Red rose hips come autumn, which are attractive to birds.

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 2 metres +

    ? Soil: well-drained, fertile soil

    Pyracantha varieties

    Known for their colourful berries available in yellow, reds and oranges which will last from Autumn through to Spring if left untouched by birds. Great against a back wall these Pyracantha will stop intruders. Available potted throughout the year.

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 3 metres

    ? Soil: well-drained, fertile soil

    Posted 26th Mar 12:12pm
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  57. Plants that look good this March

    Plants that look good this March

    With spring officially here, it’s time to start making the most of your garden and landscaping projects with some of our favourite March flowering plants that are sure to add interest to your project this spring and beyond.

    Viburnum tinus ‘Lisarose’

    An evergreen shrub with year-round interest that will produce redbuds and clusters of soft pink flowers. Ideal for brightening up a part shaded area of the garden over winter and into spring when little else is flowering.

    ? Flowers: Late November – April

    ☀️Position: Full sun – partial shade

    Available in 2L, 5L and 10L subject to availability.

    Vinca minor

    This groundcover shrub is filled with blue-violet flowers right now that will last through to September. Vincas are great low growing ground cover plants that are great at suppressing weeds and great at the front of a border.

    ☀️Position: Full sun – partial shade
    ?Flowers: Late March – September

    Available in 2L pots subject to availability.

    Pieris ‘Passion’

    An eye-catching evergreen shrub with generous pink-red bell-shaped flowers from March-May growing in full sun – partial shade it’s perfect in a large pot or on a patio.

    Available in 3L and 5L pots subject to availability.

    ?Flowers: March-May

    ?  Position: Full sun – partial shade

    Forsythia ‘Lynwood Gold’

    A striking spring-flowering plant which is smothered in golden blooms from March-April. A great addition to the back of a border or as an informal hedge.

    ?  Position: Full sun – Light Shade

    ?Flowers: February – April

    Available in 2L, 4L and 10L pots subject to availability.

    Skimmia Rubella

    Are you in need of some autumn/winter colour? Skimmia Rubella are known for their dark red flower buds that are produced in autumn and last through to winter until the flowers open in spring — an excellent plant for a patio pot or border.

    Available in 2L, 5L, 7.5L and 10L pots subject to availabilty.

    ? Flowers: March – May

    ☀️ Position: partial – full shade

    Erysimum ‘Bowles’s Mauve’

    A long-flowering semi-evergreen with narrow, grey-green leaves. This perennial produces spikes of purple flowers from late February to July and will make a great addition to a long flowering sunny border.

    ? Flowers: February – July

    ☀️ Position: Full sun

    Available in 2L pots subject to availability.

    Euphorbia wulfenii

    Is filled with huge heads of yellow-green flowers with ‘bronze eyes’ from late March-May that tower above its bluish-green foliage. Great at the back of a sunny border.

    Available in 2L pots subject to availability.

    ?Flowers:  Late March-May

    ☀️ Position:  Full sun

    Prunus ‘Kojo-no-mai’

    Is a great addition to a small garden, it’s wiry twigs burst into life in March when buds open to display pale pink flower. It’s green leaves turn to glorious shades of red and orange in Autumn.

    ?Flowers: March-April

    ☀️ Position:  Full sun

    Available in 3L, 5L and 10L pots subject to availability.

     

    For further advise, hints and tips go to our solutions page here

    Posted 17th Mar 10:50am
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  58. The Growers Choice: Hedging for shade

    The Growers Choice: Hedging for shade

    Some plants can survive with only a few hours of sun a day, whether that be early morning or late evening. Shade can be caused by a number of reasons from buildings, walls, trees and of course, the gardens natural position. Below we have put some together a list of hedging varieties that can tolerate shade from Taxus to Ilex.

    1.Taxus Baccata 

    A dark green evergreen hedging variety with needle-like leaves, ideal for your garden project’s shaded location, this variety is commonly known as ‘Yew’. It is a popular variety often used in stately homes grounds and private gardens. This hedging variety is easy to trim and can be used to create shapes for a statement feature or simply cut to create a clean line.

    Red berries are seen come Autumn, which are loved by birds but harmful to humans, pets and livestock if eaten. This slow-growing variety prefers fertile, well-drained soil.

    Available in 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L + pot sizes and as a rootball from November – March (all sizes subject to availability)

    ?Flowers: April

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 20 metres

    ? Soil: well-drained, fertile soil

    2. Ilex aquifolium 

    A variety that is known for its spikey dark, glossy, green leaves which make it a great intruder proof hedging variety.  Commonly known as Holly, this plant has an abundance of red berries during autumn and winter attracting birds to feast.

    Available in 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L + pot sizes and as a rootball from November – March (all sizes subject to availability)

    ? Position: Full sun – Full shade

    ? Height: Up to 12 metres +

    ? Soil: normal, clay or chalk soils

    3. Buxus sempervirens

    Are a great low growing hedging plant that only requires clipping once or twice a year. Perfect for edging a path or border these hedging plants will only grow 10-20cm per year. Buxus is often used in a formal garden and is great shaped. Plant in partial shade for best results.

    ? Position: Partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 5 metres

    ? Soil: well-drained, fertile soil

    Available in 1.5L, 2L,  3L, 5L, 10L +pot sizes  and as cones and balls  (all sizes subject to availability)

    4. Aucuba japonica ‘Crotonifolia

    This plant is full of thick glossy green leaves with pale yellow splashes and is particularly popular in shady areas of the garden where little else will grow. A great plant to create a dense hedge.

    ? Position:  Sun – Full shade

    ? Height: Up to 3 metres

    ? Soil: Most soil types (except waterlogged or alkaline soils)

    Available in 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L + pot sizes (all sizes subject to availability)

    5. Prunus Rotundifolia 

    A vigorous, dense evergreen shrub suitable for almost all locations. Large, glossy green leaves make this a go-to plant above other Prunus varieties.  Its density makes it ideal for screening for privacy, and it is a great barrier to noise and wind. Commonly known as laurel, this hedging variety grows up to 60cm per year and is relatively happy in most soil conditions.

    Available in 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L + pot sizes and as rootball and bare-root plants from November – March (all sizes subject to availability)

    ?Flowers: April

    ? Position: Full sun – full shade

    ? Height: Up to 5 metres

    ? Soil: well-drained, moist soil, do not plant in shallow chalk

    6. 3. Elaeagnus x ebbingei

    A tough evergreen shrub with dark green leaves with a silver speckle and attractive silver underside. This robust evergreen variety is ideal for a shady, dry, windy seaside site.

    Available in 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L + pots. (all sizes subject to availability)

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 4 metres

    ? Soil: fertile, well-drained

    Other plants to consider as shaded hedging varieties include: Berberis, Pyracantha and Leylandii.

    Unsure how many you need to plant per m? check out our hedging guide here

    Posted 12th Mar 10:20am
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  59. The Growers Choice: Hedging for small gardens

    The Growers Choice: Hedging for small gardens

    In small gardens, most people favour a wall or fence, however, there are plants that can create privacy or a boundary without taking over too much room, here’s just a few of our favourite hedging plants for small gardens below.

    1. Taxus baccata is a dark, evergreen low growing hedging plant that creates a dense screen in a garden they can be clipped back to keep a low formal hedge and will grow in sun to partial shade.

    Available in 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L + pot sizes and as a rootball from November – March

    ?Flowers: April

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 20 metres

    ? Soil: well-drained, fertile soil

    2. Ilex crenata – This evergreen hedging variety is a great alternative to Buxus hedging, resistant to box blight and not prone to leaf scorch when pruned. It can be kept as a small neat hedge and would make a great addition to a path or border.

    ?Flowers: May

    ? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ? Height: Up to 5 metres

    ? Soil: well-drained, fertile soil

    Available in 2L and 5L pots and other sizes subject to availability